With secure land tenure, Indigenous Peoples and local communities can realize human rights, achieve economic growth, protect the environment, and maintain cultural integrity.  The gap between formally recognized and customarily held and managed land is a significant source of underdevelopment, conflict, and environmental degradation [2]. Strong rights to land are vital for Indigenous Peoples and local communities. When community land rights are weak, such areas are vulnerable to land grabbing, expropriation without compensation, and encroachment by outsiders [3]. Without secure tenure rights [4], meaning rights that are enforceable and recognized by governments and others, communities face increased risk of poverty, poor health, and human rights abuse. Securing community tenure rights is not only crucial from a human rights and socio-economic development perspective, it is also necessary to mitigate climate change, foster sustainable development, and promote peacebuilding across the globe [5].

 

 

Selected indicators

The average score for the ten indicators of the legal security of community lands is also provided.

Measurement unit: 
Index (1; 4)

The average score for the ten indicators of the legal security of indigenous People lands is also provided.

Measurement unit: 
Index (1; 4)

Customary tenure rights are (i) recognized and (ii) protected in practice measured on a scale from A - which stands for good practices - to D - reflecting weak practices.

Measurement unit: 
Index (A; D)

This indicator asks whether national laws adopt VGGT principle 16.1 by providing compensation for formally recognized tenure rights held by Indigenous Peoples and local communities. Section 16.

Measurement unit: 
Index (A; C)

Forest land designated by governments for Indigenous Peoples and local communities: Ownership of forest land under this category remains claimed by the state but some rights have been recognized by

Measurement unit: 
Million ha

Forest land owned by Indigenous Peoples and local communities: Forests are considered to be “owned” where communities have full legal rights to secure their claims to forests, defined in RRI’s rese

Measurement unit: 
Million ha

Indigenous rights to land & forest are (i) recognized and (ii) protected in practice measured on a scale from A - which stands for good practices - to D - reflecting weak practices.

Measurement unit: 
Index (A; D)

Estimate of the percent of total Indigenous and Community Lands - independent of recognition status - as a percentage of the country's total land area

Measurement unit: 
Percentage

The world at a glance

Loading map...

Estimate of the percent of total Indigenous and Community Lands - not formally recognised by the State - as a percentage of the country's total land area.

Measurement unit: 
Percentage

Ranking

    Loading ranking chart

Estimate of the percent of total Indigenous and Community Lands - independent of recognition status - as a percentage of the country's total land area

Measurement unit: 
Percentage

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parties indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Share this page