Urban Land Markets , Economic Concepts And Tools For Engaging In Africa | Land Portal

Información del recurso

Date of publication: 
Diciembre 2010
Resource Language: 
Pages: 
116
License of the resource: 

This Handbook introduces key economic and related concepts explaining the functioning of urban land markets. You will find in this Handbook tools for engaging in a critical analysis of conventional economics, particularly in the understanding of how African urban land markets work. Of great importance is the understanding of how land use, supply and demand unfold in African context. It provides a basis for strengthening urban policy in ways that enable poorer people in African cities to access well-located living and work spaces.

This Handbook equips you with a better understanding of how interventions affect the market, and also how markets affect, enable, constrain and shape interventions by governments, developers, traditional authorities, banks, micro-lenders or any of its actors. It provides a sense of the dynamics of the urban land market – how particular decisions in one sector affect other sectors. This understanding provides practitioners in the field with a framework and tools to make informed decisions when formulating policies or making recommendations.

Autores y editores

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

Caroline Wanjiku Kihato
Lucille Gavera
Yunus Momoniat

Publisher(s): 
Global Land Tool Network

The Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) is an alliance of global regional and national partners contributing to poverty alleviation through land reform, improved land management and security of tenure particularly through the development and dissemination of pro-poor and gender-sensitive land tools.

Secure land tenure and property rights are fundamental to shelter and livelihoods as well as the realisation of human rights, poverty reduction,economic prosperity and sustainable development.

"Urban LandMark" is short for the Urban Land Markets Programme Southern Africa. Based in Pretoria, the programme was set up in May 2006 with seven years of funding from the UK's Department for International Development until March 2013. The initiative is now hosted at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in South Africa.

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