Center for International Forestry Research | Page 5 | Land Portal
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)
Acronym: 
CIFOR
Focal point: 
cifor@cgiar.org

The Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) is a non-profit, scientific facility that conducts research on the most pressing challenges of forest and landscapes management around the world. With our global, multidisciplinary approach, we aim to improve human well-being, protect the environment, and increase equity. To do so, we help policymakers, practitioners and communities make decisions based on solid science about how they use and manage their forests and landscapes.

Capacity building, collaboration and partnerships are essential to finding and implementing innovative solutions to the challenges that the globe faces. We are proud to work with local and international partners. We are a member of the CGIAR Consortium and lead the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

Our headquarters are in Bogor, Indonesia. We have offices in 8 countries across Asia, Latin America and Africa, and we work in more than 30 countries. Contact us for more information.

Center for International Forestry Research Resources

Mostrando 41 - 50 de 783
Library Resource
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Agosto, 2018
Uganda

Although Tanzania looks back onto a long history of land degradation, it has seen significant restoration efforts even before the African Forest Landscape Restoration Initiative (AFR 100) was launched. Building on this experience, the fact sheet highlights the main landscape restoration approaches employed in the country and elaborates on the major constraints as well as enabling conditions for FLR.

Library Resource
Informes e investigaciones
Agosto, 2018
Uganda

The National Forestry Authority has monitored Uganda’s land cover, including forested areas, periodically since 1990. The land cover classification is comprised of 13 classes as shown in the table below. The first five classes in the table refer to the different types of forests in Uganda. The largest forest type is woodland. Compared to other landcover types, forests are a small proportion of the country area.

Library Resource
The Scramble for Land Rights cover image

Reducing Inequity between Communities and Companies

Informes e investigaciones
Julio, 2018
Global

Increasing global demand for natural resources is intensifying competition for land across the developing world, pushing companies onto territories that many Indigenous Peoples and rural communities have sustainably managed for generations.

Library Resource
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Enero, 2018
Global

This collection of 12 stories from women and men in nine countries in different parts of Africa shines a light on the efforts of communities, some of them decades-long, in restoring degraded forests and landscapes. The stories are not generated through any rigorous scientific process, but are nonetheless illustrative of the opportunities communities create as they solve their own problems, and of the many entry points we have for supporting and accelerating community effort.

Library Resource
Informes e investigaciones
Enero, 2018
Global

Constructive critique. This book provides a critical, evidence-based analysis of REDD+ implementation so far, without losing sight of the urgent need to reduce forest-based emissions to prevent catastrophic climate change.

REDD+ as envisioned has not been tested at scale. Results-based payment, the novel feature of REDD+, has gone untested. International funding (both public and private) remains scarce, and demand through carbon markets is lacking.

Library Resource
Informes e investigaciones
Enero, 2018
Indonesia, Global

When development impacts a broad landscape and causes the loss of multiple ecosystem services, decisions about which of these impacts to offset must be made. We use industrial oil-palm developments in Kalimantan and quantify the potential for restoration to offset oil-palm impacts on carbon storage and biodiversity. We developed a unique backcasting approach combined with a spatial conservation prioritisation framework to identify priority areas for restoration offsetting.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2017

Gender biases persist in forestry research and practice. These biases result in reduced scientific rigor and inequitable, ineffective, and less efficient policies, programs, and interventions. Drawing from a two-volume collection of current and classic analyses on gender in forests, we outline five persistent and inter-related themes: gendered governance, tree tenure, forest spaces, division of labor, and ecological knowledge.

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