Land reform experiences. Some lessons from across South Asia | Land Portal

Informations sur la ressource

Date of publication: 
avril 2018
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
FAODOCREP:I8296EN
Pages: 
58
License of the resource: 
Copyright details: 
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This study draws on some case studies of land reforms in different South Asian countries. These reforms came on the national and international agenda in a major way in the post- World-War II period and were led by the transition theory, requiring agriculture to provide both surplus and labor for the growth of a modern industrial economy and leading to focus on efficiency in agricultural production (which would release resources -capital and labor- for investment in the modern industrial sector), rather than on distribution. The study also attempts to assess the role of peasant organizations and civil societies in bringing land reform issues to the forefront. Though the State is the main actor in the land reform process, the role played by peasants, workers, in fact the society as a whole, should not be underestimated.

Auteurs et éditeurs

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 
Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Bangkok (Thailand) praveen jha Sharma, Ramesh ; Jha, Praveen K
Corporate Author(s): 

A unified Thai kingdom was established in the mid-14th century. Known as Siam until 1939, Thailand is the only Southeast Asian country never to have been colonized by a European power. A bloodless revolution in 1932 led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy. In alliance with Japan during World War II, Thailand became a US treaty ally in 1954 after sending troops to Korea and later fighting alongside the US in Vietnam.

Publisher(s): 

A unified Thai kingdom was established in the mid-14th century. Known as Siam until 1939, Thailand is the only Southeast Asian country never to have been colonized by a European power. A bloodless revolution in 1932 led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy. In alliance with Japan during World War II, Thailand became a US treaty ally in 1954 after sending troops to Korea and later fighting alongside the US in Vietnam.

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