Land Policy & Legislation

Displaying 1 - 10 of 15168
Legislation & Policies
June 2018
Mexico

DECRETO por el que se abroga la Ley General de Desarrollo Forestal Sustentable, publicada en el Diario Oficial de la Federación, el 25 de febrero de 2003, se expide la Ley General de Desarrollo Forestal Sustentable; y se reforma el primer párrafo al artículo 105 y se adiciona un segundo párrafo al mismo artículo de la Ley General del Equilibrio Ecológico y la Protección al Ambiente.

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Conference Papers & Reports
May 2018
Global

Date: mai 2018

Source: Foncier & Développement

Par: Anne-Laure Sablé

Récit d’un immobilisme au détriment d’une conversion de nos modèles agricoles

Reports & Research
April 2018
Kenya

Throughout 2017, Spatial Collective applied new technologies to the data capture element of land registration in order to test whether affordable tools for documentation of land exist, whether these tools can reach the accuracy standards required by the state, and whether communities can replicate the work of a professional surveyorTo do this, our research looked into the land demarcation process, determined whether new technologies were of quality and met national standards, and gauged the most cost-effective tools which are widely accessible to local c

Peer-reviewed publication
March 2018
South Africa
Southern Africa

Inclusive businesses (IBs), embodying partnerships between commercial agribusinesses and smallholder farmers/low-income communities, are considered to contribute towards rural development and agricultural sector transformation. Structured as complex organizational set-ups consisting of, and overcoming the limitations of, standard inclusive instruments (collective organization, mentorship, supply contract, lease/management contract and equity), they allow for the inclusion of smallholders and low-income communities into commercial agricultural value chains.

Peer-reviewed publication
March 2018
Kenya

Kenya is the most recent African state to acknowledge customary tenure as producing lawful property rights, not merely rights of occupation and use on government or public lands. This paper researches this new legal environment. This promises land security for 6 to 10 million Kenyans, most of who are members of pastoral or other poorer rural communities. Analysis is prefaced with substantial background on legal trends continentally, but the focus is on Kenya’s Community Land Act, 2016, as the framework through which customary holdings are to be identified and registered.

Peer-reviewed publication
March 2018

In Nigeria, the recurring impoverishment and other negative socioeconomic impacts endured by landholders affected by expropriation are well-documented and call into question the Land Use Act’s (LUA) effectiveness in protecting local land rights. The World Bank’s Land Governance Assessment Framework found that, in Nigeria, “a large number of acquisitions occurs without prompt and adequate compensation, thus leaving those losing land worse off, with no mechanism for independent appeal even though the land is often not utilized for a public purpose”.

Women's Land Rights in Liberia in Law, Practice, and Future Reforms cover image
Reports & Research
March 2018
Liberia

Land is the most important asset for many rural Liberian women and men, and is often a family’s primary source of cash income, food and nutritional security, health care, and education. Though women play a central role in agricultural production in Liberia, women’s rights and access to land are often not equal to those of men due to biases in the formal legal framework and customary law.

Reports & Research
March 2018
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia

Most of the world’s remaining tropical forests lie in areas that are customarily managed and/or legally owned by Indigenous Peoples and local communities. In the context of climate change and global efforts to protect and enhance the capacity of forests to capture and store greenhouse gas emissions, the question of who owns the trees and the carbon stored therein is paramount. Clarifying this question is crucial, both for the future of the planet, and for up to 1.7 billion people worldwide who rely on forests for their livelihoods.

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