Tanzania Local Customary Law - Local Customary Law (Declaration) (No. 4) Order 436 of 1963 | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

Resource information

Date of publication: 
August 1963
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
LandWise:record[2563]:item[2606]

This is a resource from the Resource Equity LandWise database of resources.

Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 
Government of Tanzania
Corporate Author(s): 

Shortly after achieving independence from Britain in the early 1960s, Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to form the United Republic of Tanzania in 1964. One-party rule ended in 1995 with the first democratic elections held in the country since the 1970s. Zanzibar's semi-autonomous status and popular opposition led to two contentious elections since 1995, which the ruling party won despite international observers' claims of voting irregularities. The formation of a government of national unity between Zanzibar's two leading parties succeeded in minimizing electoral tension in 2010.

Publisher(s): 

Shortly after achieving independence from Britain in the early 1960s, Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to form the United Republic of Tanzania in 1964. One-party rule ended in 1995 with the first democratic elections held in the country since the 1970s. Zanzibar's semi-autonomous status and popular opposition led to two contentious elections since 1995, which the ruling party won despite international observers' claims of voting irregularities. The formation of a government of national unity between Zanzibar's two leading parties succeeded in minimizing electoral tension in 2010.

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