Handshake, No. 6 (July 2012) | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

Resource information

Date of publication: 
July 2015
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
oai:openknowledge.worldbank.org:10986/22252
Copyright details: 
CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 IGO

Air and sea transport power the global
economy. Since the vast majority of trade is physical, it
must travel by plane or ship to reach its market. In fact,
high value, time-sensitive goods usually fly through at
least two airports, and almost every container passes
through at least two seaports. When ports are efficient,
people receive the goods theyre waiting for, sellers receive
payment, and global economic development is strengthened.
Public-private partnerships (PPPs) push this development
forward with greater speed and richer benefits. In this
issue, handshake turns its attention to air and sea
transport (expect a companion issue on road and rail in
October 2012). In the air, we deconstruct myths surrounding
airport PPPs, learn brutally honest lessons from experiences
in airline privatization, and revisit the liberalization of
African skies. For seaports, the authors examine private
investment, glimpse the post concession era, and witness the
PPP evolution.

Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 
International Finance Corporation
Publisher(s): 

IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, is the largest global development institution focused exclusively on the private sector in developing countries.

We utilize and leverage our products and services—as well as products and services of other institutions in the World Bank Group—to provide development solutions customized to meet clients’ needs. We apply our financial resources, technical expertise, global experience, and innovative thinking to help our partners overcome financial, operational, and political challenges.

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The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. We are not a bank in the ordinary sense but a unique partnership to reduce poverty and support development.

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