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Showing items 1 through 9 of 392.
  1. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2018
    Thailand

    This paper uses data collected in Thailand among permanent rural-urban migrants to analyse the motivations in land temporary transfers such as free loans or rentals. Land transfers are here looked at in a continuum and categorized according to three characteristics: the nature of the relationship between the parties of the exchange, the monetary nature of the payment as well as its explicit or imlicit nature. This methodology allows a richer typology than traditionnally used in empiric literature, and distinguishes between various loans that are not always free.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    May, 2015
    Guatemala, Norway, Thailand

    As part of its efforts to improve the rural economies of its client countries, the World Bank is supporting programs to strengthen land administration and undertake land reform. Land administration projects can include a variety of activities. Usually, the most expensive and that which is most likely to have direct, tangible benefits is land titling. The provision of titles to landowners is only part of complex process, however. Titles by themselves are unlikely to bring lasting benefits unless there is a functioning registry and cadastre and a system to adjudicate disputes.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2018
    Thailand

    This paper contributes to an emerging literature on free land arrangements in developing countries. We argue that in-depth empirical analysis is crucial to understand the specific terms of land arrangements. Using mixed quantitative and qualitative data collected among rural-urban migrants in Thailand, we categorize land arrangements along four dimensions: self-reported categories by the actors, the nature of the relationship between the parties involved, the nature of the payment made, and how explicit or binding are the contractual terms.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    July, 2016
    Thailand

    Using an economy-wide conceptual framework, the author analyzes how land registration affects financial development and economic growth in Thailand. He uses contemporary techniques, such as error correction and co-integration, to deal with such problems as time-series data not being stationary. He also uses the auto-regressive distributed lag model to analyze long lags in output response to changes in land registration. His key findings: 1) Land titling has significant positive long-run effects on financial development.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    July, 2016
    Norway, Thailand, United States of America

    The author develops a theoretical framework to guide empirical analysis of how land registration affects financial development and economic growth. Most conceptual approaches investigate the effects of land registration on only one sector, nut land registration is commonly observed to affect not only other sectors but the economy as a whole. The author builds on the well-tested link between secure land ownership and farm productivity, adding to the framework theory about positive information and transaction costs.

  6. Library Resource

    Local sustainable development solutions for people, nature, and resilient communities

    Reports & Research
    December, 2004
    Thailand

    Local and indigenous communities across the world are advancing innovative sustainable development solutions that work for people and for nature. Few publications or case studies tell the full story of how such initiatives evolve, the breadth of their impacts, or how they change over time. Fewer still have undertaken to tell these stories with community practitioners themselves guiding the narrative. The Equator Initiative aims to fill that gap.

  7. Library Resource

    Local sustainable development solutions for people, nature, and resilient communities

    Reports & Research
    December, 2004
    Thailand

    Local and indigenous communities across the world are advancing innovative sustainable development solutions that work for people and for nature. Few publications or case studies tell the full story of how such initiatives evolve, the breadth of their impacts, or how they change over time. Fewer still have undertaken to tell these stories with community practitioners themselves guiding the narrative. The Equator Initiative aims to fill that gap.

  8. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 1979
    Thailand

    Explores the relationship between fertility and socioeconomic and demographic variables, as well as the determinants of the acceptance of family planning in rural Thailand. Includes a bibliography.

  9. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    August, 2012
    Indonesia, Cambodia, Nepal, Thailand, Vietnam

    "The main argument for community forestry, in the context of climate change, is that it responds to multiple interests.  Forests, and in particular community forestry, represent a bundle of assets and benefits. They serve as a safety net in times of hardship and support critical ecosystems required for well-being.  The cases point out that while the contributions of community forestry to mitigation are well-recognized, in the case of adaptation, community forestry is equally well placed to support adaptive capacity, but this is not automatic." - Regan Suzuki

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