Search results | Land Portal

Search results

Showing items 1 through 9 of 214.
  1. Library Resource
    Shifting Cultivation in Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Nepal
    Reports & Research
    July, 2015
    Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal

    Shifting cultivation is a dominant form of farming in the eastern Himalayas, practised by a diverse group of indigenous people from the most marginalized social and economic groups. The survival of these indigenous people and the survival of their forests are inextricably linked. However, policy makers and natural resource managers perceive shifting cultivation to be wasteful, destructive to forests, and unsustainable.

  2. Library Resource
    Effectiveness of community forest user groups (CFUGs) in responding to the 2015 earthquakes and COVI
    Peer-reviewed publication
    October, 2020
    Nepal

    Natural disasters and pandemics are evolving as major global threats that are posing an enormous challenge to socio- economic and environmental wellbeing. Using a real time analysis of the impressive role played by Community Forest User Groups (CFUGs) in Nepal in responding to the 2015 earthquakes (Earthquake-15) and COVID-19, this paper explores the scopes, capacities, institutional strengths and attributes required for community-based institutions such as CFUGs to become effective in managing and responding natural or other disasters.

  3. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2015
    Nepal

    Funds generated through community forestry offer crucial and significant resources for rural in Nepal. This study examines forestry funds in 100 communities in three districts to assess how large they are and how they are utilized. The study finds that the income from community funds increases local development resources by about 25%. This income is invested in schools, temples, roads, and water reservoirs, which bodes well for rural development.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    August, 2010
    Nepal

    Community forestry in Nepal is intended to reduce poverty by sustainable management of forests. Timber is one of the most high-value forest products, especially in the case of Sal (Shorea robusta) forests in the Terai region of Nepal. Despite having several advantages, including high value forests on fertile land, connection with transportation networks, and being close to regional markets, community forests in the Terai region produce little or no timber from their Sal forests. This research looks at what is affecting the production of Sal timber from community forests.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    November, 2010
    Nepal

    Management of many Nepalese forests has been devolved to local communities. Forest products, which are used by the community and which may also be traded, are essential contributors to community well-being. Forests are also important contributors of ecosystem services, such as flood protection and wildlife habitat. Nepalese communities were surveyed to measure flows of forest products from their community forests. A stochastic frontier analysis shows that communities are not producing forest products efficiently and there is potential for improvement.

  6. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    April, 2018
    Nepal

    Despite the local and global importance of forests, deforestation driven by various socio-economic and biophysical factors continues in many countries. In Nepal, in response to massive deforestation, the community forestry program has been implemented to reduce deforestation and support livelihoods. After four decades of its inception, the effectiveness of this program on forest cover change remains mostly unknown.

  7. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    April, 2008
    Nepal

    Funds generated through community forestry offer crucial and significant resources for rural in Nepal. This study examines forestry funds in 100 communities in three districts to assess how large they are and how they are utilized. The study finds that the income from community funds increases local development resources by about 25%. This income is invested in schools, temples, roads, and water reservoirs, which bodes well for rural development.

  8. Library Resource
    Journal Articles & Books
    December, 2015
    Nepal

    Previously lineal and centralized natural resource management and development paradigms have shifted toward the recognition of complexity and dynamism of social-ecological systems, and toward more adaptive, decentralized, and collaborative models. However, certain messy and surprising dynamics remain under-recognized, including the inherent interplay between conflict, social capital, and governance. In this study we consider the dynamic intersections of these three often (seemingly) disparate phenomena.

  9. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    December, 2003
    Nepal

    Poverty, property rights and distributional implications of community-based resource management have become major topics of discussion and debate in recent years. This study tries to examine the contribution of community forestry to household-level income with particular emphasis on group heterogeneity and equity in benefit distribution. The assessment of household level benefits suggests that poorer households are currently benefiting less in absolute terms from community forestry than less poor households.

Land Library Search

Through our robust search engine, you can search for any item of the over 64,800 highly curated resources in the Land Library. 

If you would like to find an overview of what is possible, feel free to peruse the Search Guide


Share this page