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Showing items 1 through 9 of 77.
  1. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2006
    South Africa, Southern Africa, Eastern Africa

    Indigenous land tenure arrangements in South Africa have generally consisted of communal ownership. In this system, who benefited from the land depended on their status as family or clan head. The colonial regime dispossessed Africans of land in favour of European arrivals, or defined family property as ancestral property in which the senior males of the head family were taken as the owners with the rights to inherit. The post-apartheid government conceptualised acess to land for the previously disadvantaged as a human right.

  2. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    April, 2003
    Burkina Faso, Tunisia, Senegal, Western Africa, Western Asia, Northern Africa

    Women do 70 per cent of the agricultural work in Senegal, but according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), own only two percent of the land that may be cultivated. Although property laws in countries such as Senegal, Tunisia and Burkina Faso recognise women' s and men's equal rights, and Islam gives women the right to inherit half what men inherit, in practice men retain land ownership. Women are dependent on fathers or husbands for land.

  3. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August, 2002
    Peru, South America

    This shadow report, led by The Latin American and Caribbean Committee for the Defense of Women's Rights -Peru (CLADEM-Peru), contributes to the United Nations Committee that monitors the implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). It is an opportunity for women's groups to monitor their government and to raise concerns about the official submission of the government to the CEDAW committee.

  4. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    February, 2003
    Indonesia, Philippines, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

    How does the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on Agriculture (AOA) affect the livelihoods of rural women in Asia? This paper, prepared on the occasion of the WTO-AOA review in 2003, analyzes the impact of the new trading rules imposed by the WTO on Asian peasants. It illustrates the inherent imbalances in the WTO-AOA's trade liberalisation policies which, among other things, flood local markets with highly subsidized agricultural imports from developed countries to the detriment of domestic agriculture.

  5. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 2002
    India, Central Asia, Southern Asia

    Do women have effective land rights in practice? Research and policy have only recently begun to engage with the need for women to have independent rights to fields of their own. What needs to be done? Four areas for action are identified with associated strategies: improve women's claims on private land (e. g. through gender equal inheritance laws); improve women's access to public land (e.g. through land reform schemes); improve women's access to land via the market (e.g. through subsidised credit); and improve the viability of women's farming efforts (e.g.

  6. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    January, 2004
    Ghana, Western Africa

    This study attempts to analyse changing patterns of land transfer and ownership, as well as school investments by gender over three generations in customary land areas of Ghana's Western Region. Traditional inheritance rules deny land ownership rights to women. Yet the increase in the demand for women's labour due to the expansion of labour intensive cocoa cultivation has created incentives for husbands to give their wives and children land. Through this and other gift mechanisms, women have increasingly acquired land, thereby reducing the gender gap in land ownership.

  7. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    March, 1997
    Oceania

    How are family gender relations affected by extra-household conditions in South Asia' By investigating quantitative factors (e.g. land ownership and income), along with qualitative aspects (e.g. social perceptions, interaction of gender relations in market, community, state and household), this paper shows how these multiple conditions influence the relative bargaining power of different household members. It argues that such understanding is vital for designing policy interventions. Control over land and income increases an individual's bargaining power.

  8. Library Resource
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December, 2007
    Global

    Current momentum around women's economic empowerment offers huge scope for bringing about real changes in women's lives. But earning an income or having access to credit cannot be assumed to bring automatic benefits for women. We need to ask critical questions about how increased access to resources can be translated into changes in the strategic choices that women are able to make - at the level of the household and community, as well as at work. What of the terms on which women gain access to resources - are these empowering or exploitative?

  9. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    January, 1998
    Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Global, Central Asia, Southern Asia

    Do women work more or less when countries trade more? Do trade expansion and economic liberalisation affect women and men in different ways'? Case studies from Ghana, Uganda, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Jamaica are used in this report to illustrate some of the gender dimensions relating to trade. Present evidence suggests that, under certain conditions, export expansion can benefit certain groups of younger, more educated women. However in general, the rights of women workers to fair terms and conditions of employment need protection.

  10. Library Resource
    Reports & Research
    October, 1997
    Global

    How would environmentally sustainable development look if it was gender-sensitive? This report argues that much mainstream literature on environmentally sustainable development has ignored the gender dimensions. Where women have been the target of programmes, they have been seen as natural managers of environmental resources. A gender analysis is important because gender relations affect the ways in which poor men and women manage natural resources.

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