International Union for Conservation of Nature | Page 4 | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data



IUCN is a membership Union uniquely composed of both government and civil society organisations. It provides public, private and non-governmental organisations with the knowledge and tools that enable human progress, economic development and nature conservation to take place together.

Created in 1948, IUCN is now the world’s largest and most diverse environmental network, harnessing the knowledge, resources and reach of more than 1,300 Member organisations and some 16,000 experts. It is a leading provider of conservation data, assessments and analysis. Its broad membership enables IUCN to fill the role of incubator and trusted repository of best practices, tools and international standards.

IUCN provides a neutral space in which diverse stakeholders including governments, NGOs, scientists, businesses, local communities, indigenous peoples organisations and others can work together to forge and implement solutions to environmental challenges and achieve sustainable development.

Working with many partners and supporters, IUCN implements a large and diverse portfolio of conservation projects worldwide. Combining the latest science with the traditional knowledge of local communities, these projects work to reverse habitat loss, restore ecosystems and improve people’s well-being.

International Union for Conservation of Nature Resources

Displaying 31 - 40 of 76
Conference Papers & Reports
June 2015
Western Africa
Burkina Faso
Guinea
Mali
Niger
Senegal

This is the report of a workshop held on 8 and 9 June 2015 in Bamako, Mali, to present and discuss the results of a study on securing irrigated land tenure in the six countries within the Permanent Inter-State Committee for the Fight against Drought in the Sahel (CILSS) in the context of the "Dakar Declaration".

Reports & Research
March 2015
Guinea

The Fomi dam project is located on the Niandan tributary of the Niger in Guinea, 30 km upstream of the Niandan-Niger confluence, near Kankan (region of Upper Guinea). In development since 1988 with an update of the feasibility study in 1999, the Fomi project is integrated in the Sustainable Development Action Plan (SDAP) of the Niger Basin Authority (NBA) since 2007.

Reports & Research
March 2015
Guinea

Le projet de barrage de Fomi se situe sur le Niandan, affluent du Niger en Haute-Guinée, non loin de Kankan. Le projet Fomi est intégré au Plan d’action de développement durable (PADD) de l’Autorité du Bassin du Niger (ABN) depuis 2007.

Reports & Research
January 2015
Global

The case studies from Brazil, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, the Philippines and Viet Nam highlight how forest landscape restoration (FLR) interventions enhance food security.

Policy Papers & Briefs
January 2015
Armenia

In Armenia, the forestry sector and forest restoration policy development and decision making in natural resources management processes have been shaped as a result of women’s historical every day practices—which are also often drivers of deforestation and degradation—and yet women’s direct participation in these matters is frequently neglected.

Policy Papers & Briefs
January 2015
Global

Licuri is a highly valuable tree species, both to local ecosystems and in traditional cultural uses, with a clear commercial niche. Its productive and sustainable uses are directly linked to ecosystem conservation and women’s empowerment—which is being further developed to great success.

Reports & Research
January 2015
Uganda

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), in partnership with the Ugandan Ministry of Water and Environment, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), as well as local governments and civil society organizations, have been working to address many of the climate-related issues in the Sanzara community by employing Forest La

Journal Articles & Books
December 2014
Mongolia
Asia

Elinor Ostrom's work has been the principal inspiration for a number of research and development initiatives in Mongolia aimed at designing, testing and assessing viable forms of natural resources co-management that build on traditional nomadic practices. One such initiative, begun in 1999, introduced co-management in four different ecosystems of the country.

Reports & Research
November 2014
Niger

In Niger the land converted for public use is now facing a dual problem: on one hand, customary landowners or their descendants claim property rights on this space which supposedly belongs to the State, on the other hand, government bodies who manage this area do not have the legal documents to justify the State's rights over the developed (irrigated) land and, consequently, to protect it.

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