World Resources Institute | Page 6 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
WRI
Focal point: 
Peter Veit

The World Resources Institute is a global environmental think tank that goes beyond research to put ideas into action. We work with governments, companies, and civil society to build solutions to urgent environmental challenges. WRI’s transformative ideas protect the earth and promote development because sustainability is essential to meeting human needs and fulfilling human aspirations in the future.

WRI spurs progress by providing practical strategies for change and effective tools to implement them. We measure our success in the form of new policies, products, and practices that shift the ways governments work, companies operate, and people act.

We operate globally because today’s problems know no boundaries. We are avid communicators because people everywhere are inspired by ideas, empowered by knowledge, and moved to change by greater understanding. We provide innovative paths to a sustainable planet through work that is accurate, fair, and independent.

World Resources Institute Resources

Displaying 51 - 60 of 61
Reports & Research
January 2011
Africa

The following lesson brief examines the land issues confronting returnees as well as the IDPs who remain in the camps in Uganda. In 2005, between 2.1 million and 2.4 million people were displaced by co

Journal Articles & Books
December 2007
Kenya
Africa
Eastern Africa

Nature’s Benefits in Kenya: An Atlas of Ecosystems and Human Well-Being integrates spatial data on poverty and the environment

in Kenya, providing a new approach to examining the links between ecosystem services (the benefits derived from nature)

and the poor. This publication focuses on the environmental resources

Reports & Research
December 2007
Kenya
Africa
Eastern Africa

This report provides a new approach to integrating spatial data on poverty and ecosystems in Kenya. It is endorsed by five permanent secretaries in Kenya and with a foreword by Wangari Maathai (recipient of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize). It provides a new approach to examining the links between ecosystem services (the benefits derived from nature) and the poor.

Reports & Research
November 1997
Myanmar

Lots of maps...Burma holds half of the remaining forest in mainland Southeast Asia. Having lost virtually all of their original forest cover, Burma's neighbors -- China, India, and Thailand -- rely increasingly on Burma as a source of timber. Most of the regional timber trade is illegal. (See The Regional Timber Trade in Southeast Asia.)

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