Farm Africa | Land Portal

Poverty is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa, with more than 40% of the population living below the poverty line, surviving on incomes of less than $1.90 a day.

That’s where Farm Africa comes in. 

Africa possesses 60% of the world's uncultivated land suitable for crop production and has huge capacity for development. Farm Africa believes that Africa has the power to feed itself.

Farm Africa helps farmers grow more, sell more and sell for more. We pioneer techniques that boost harvests, build rural incomes, sustain natural resources and help end Africa’s need for aid.

We work with communities, the private sector and governments to make sure we’re finding the most effective ways to increase food production.

Typically, our staff are from the local area, can speak the local language, and have a deep understanding of the local context.

Our technical experts closely monitor the results of projects, and adapt approaches as needed. Recognising that the private sector has a huge role to play in developing prosperity in rural Africa, we help smallholder farmers to develop links to markets.

What we do

Farm Africa’s local staff provide the tools and expertise to enable smallholders in eastern Africa to increase their harvests, whether they farm crops, livestock, fish or the forest.

We train them to be more commercial, adding value to surpluses by milling, drying, or turning their produce into products that fetch a higher price.

With better food for their families and reliable incomes from their businesses, farmers can build for the future.

How we work

Farm Africa is different. We are a specialist practitioner, focusing on four east African countries and concentrating only on farming.

Our 170 staff on the ground are highly qualified east African experts with a deep understanding of the region.  

Sustainability

We promote ‘climate-smart’ approaches so farmers can manage their natural resources sustainably, become more resilient to climate change and build long-term food security.

Practical approach

Our mix of agricultural innovation and training in effective marketing skills equips farmers to grow and earn more.

Through business training and setting up farmers' groups, they can get a higher price for their crops, and by learning how to process and store their produce they reduce waste and have more crop to sell. 

We're also piloting mobile technology as a cost effective and efficient way of reaching the largest number of farmers possible. 

Spreading knowledge

Farm Africa tests new farming techniques and technologies and trains farmers how to use them. Success breeds success - once trained, farmers pass on their new-found knowledge to others, ensuring our work has an impact well beyond our projects.  

By testing farming approaches in the region’s various soils and climates, the evidence we collect is more robust and the techniques we spread are proven to work.

We are developing new, self-sustaining business models, such as:

Sidai - a franchised animal health social enterprise
Enterprise fund - supporting small-scale producers using innovative technologies to improve production
Private sector relationships - connecting barley farmers with business.

Farming without frontiers

Although eastern Africa is widely varied in its landscapes and peoples, there are many common farming problems everyone faces. Our approach is to spread tried-and-tested methods as widely as possible. Farm Africa works on regional projects across more than one country, sharing knowledge without the constraint of country borders.

Farm Africa Resources

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Library Resource
Janeiro, 2005
África do Sul, África subsariana

This paper documents a participatory approach for supporting black South Africans in developing knowledge and skills to use land, acquired under the land reform scheme, more effectively. This approach enables land reform groups to work jointly through a sequence of steps in order to develop and implement a land management plan.The participatory planning method can be summarised into four main stages. First, the land reform group seeks to understand how the agricultural sector operates in its area, and identifies those agencies that provide technical and managerial support.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2005
África do Sul, África subsariana

One of the key objectives of the South African land reform programme is to provide poor people with an additional asset that they could use to develop strategies to escape from poverty. Although land ownership patterns have begun to change, there is little evidence to show how land reform beneficiaries are using their land and whether it is making a significant impact on poverty reduction.This report is based on a study examining the assets, activities and income sources of a random sample of households chosen from eight land reform groups, looking at changes between 2001 and 2003.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2005
África do Sul, África subsariana

Since 1994, the South African government has embarked on an ambitious land reform programme to redistribute and return land to previously disenfranchised communities. However, many black people lack the knowledge, skills and experience needed to manage their land.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2005
África do Sul

One of the key objectives of the South African land reform programme is to provide poor people with an additional asset that they could use to develop strategies to escape from poverty. Although land ownership patterns have begun to change, there is little evidence to show how land reform beneficiaries are using their land and whether it is making a significant impact on poverty reduction.This report is based on a study examining the assets, activities and income sources of a random sample of households chosen from eight land reform groups, looking at changes between 2001 and 2003.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2005
África do Sul

Since 1994, the South African government has embarked on an ambitious land reform programme to redistribute and return land to previously disenfranchised communities. However, many black people lack the knowledge, skills and experience needed to manage their land.

Library Resource
Janeiro, 2005
África do Sul

This paper documents a participatory approach for supporting black South Africans in developing knowledge and skills to use land, acquired under the land reform scheme, more effectively. This approach enables land reform groups to work jointly through a sequence of steps in order to develop and implement a land management plan.The participatory planning method can be summarised into four main stages. First, the land reform group seeks to understand how the agricultural sector operates in its area, and identifies those agencies that provide technical and managerial support.

Library Resource
Relatórios e Pesquisa
Agosto, 2003
África

Looks at key problems affecting land reform beneficiaries in FARM-Africa projects in the Northern Cape: livelihoods, the right to settle, lack of infrastructure, too poor to farm?, development plans, the management capacity of executive committees, gaining access to technical agricultural support and credit, equitable access and grazing fees, obligations of having water rights, the responsibility for Act 126 projects, government policies and their effects on emerging farmers.

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