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Zambia has a bifurcated land tenure system which results from a legacy of colonial land administration. Under the British governor in 1928, Zambian land was divided into crown land and reserve native land. Later in 1947 the Native Trust Order was passed which gave birth to trust land. Crown land made up 6 percent of the country, while native and trust land both totalled up to 94 percent. After independence, crown land was converted to state land. Reserve native and trust land remained as such until the 1995 Land Act at which point these tenure types began being labeled as "customary" land. The Land Acquisition Act of 1970 inspired the ‘zambianisation’ (nationalisation) program, which sealed the deal of the 1975 Land (Conversion of Titles) Act that halted freehold tenure system in Zambia. All land in Zambia has since then been vested in the President, who holds it in perpetuity on behalf of the Zambian people.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Zambia.

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