Sierra Leone | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
Sierre Leone agriculture photo by WorldFish

Sierra Leone has endured years of political and economic instability as a direct consequence of the civil war that lasted more than 10 years. During the war, many people left the country, much of the infrastructure was destroyed and institutions nearly disappeared. The country’s GDP is largely based on agriculture, amounting to 43% of the total GDP; 62% of rural population is rural, and the majority works in agriculture or mining sectors.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Sierra Leone.

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

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8 March 2019
Kenya
South Africa
Liberia
Sierra Leone
Indonesia
Philippines

 

These are dark days if you care about justice. New estimates reveal that over 5 billion people live outside the protection of the law. These are people who can be driven from their land, intimidated by violence, and excluded from society.

Against the backdrop of this staggering figure, community paralegals offer hope.

12 February 2019
Sierra Leone

Millions of peasant farmers in the rural areas of Sierra Leone do not own land of their own but have to rent from land owning families. Added to their poverty is the fact that they depend on Shylock money lenders to secure seeds and capital for their farming activities.

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We are reminded on a daily basis that the natural environment in which we live is vitally important for our well-being, whether it is in the form of climate change, global warming, declining fertility or dwindling natural resources.

The British set up a trading post near present-day Freetown in the 17th century. Originally the trade involved timber and ivory, but later it expanded into slaves. Following the American Revolution, a colony was established in 1787 and Sierra Leone became a destination for resettling black loyalists who had originally been resettled in Nova Scotia. After the abolition of the slave trade in 1807, British crews delivered thousands of Africans liberated from illegal slave ships to Sierra Leone, particularly Freetown.

Sierra Leone Legal Information Institute ("Sierra LII") is a non-profit organization registered in Sierra Leone that aims to contribute to the continuing national progress by providing free access to the nation’s legal information.  Free access to legal information of other countries and regions of the world is also made possible through its affiliation with the Free Access to Law Movement and the global network of Legal Information Institutes.

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