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Since its independence in 1960, Ivory Coast experienced a long period of stability and economic growth thanks to the investments in the agricultural sector. However, in 1980 rapid population growth and internal migration from urban to rural areas increased the pressure on the management and distribution of natural resources, which gave rise to a series of conflicts over land. The 1999 Coup d’Etat exacerbated the situation, as conflicts and political instability spread, particularly in relation to the control of land.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Ivory Coast

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

Measurement unit: 
Number
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Arable land (1'000 Ha) is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens

Measurement unit: 
1'000 Ha

It measures the area (1'000 Ha) covered by forest.

Measurement unit: 
1'000 Ha

Land area is the total area (1'000 Ha) of the country excluding area under inland water bodies.

Measurement unit: 
1'000 Ha

Permanent crops (1'000 Ha) - land cultivated with long-term crops which do not have to be replanted for several years (such as cocoa and coffee); land under trees and shrubs producing flowers, such

Measurement unit: 
1000 Ha

Permanent meadows and pastures - land used permanently (five years or more) to grow herbaceous forage crops, either cultivated or growing wild (wild prairie or grazing land).

Measurement unit: 
1000 Ha

Latest News

Ivory Coast

By: Joe Bavier

Date: 19 September 2016

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation 

Rights groups have accused Ivory Coast authorities of failing to provide a minimum level of support when they evicted tens of thousands of illegal cocoa farmers from a national park, leaving them vulnerable and putting pressure on local communities.

The government rejected the criticism on Friday.

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Ivory Coast
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United States of America

By: Chris Arsenault
Date: September 1st 2016
Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation

RIO DE JANEIRO (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Countries will be unable to meet their climate change pledges unless they secure land rights for people living in the world's tropical forests, indigenous leaders told an international conference of regional governors meeting in Mexico.

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