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NRC Research Press is a division of Canadian Science Publishing - a not-for-profit publisher


The NRC Research Press journals are Canadian Science Publishing’s flagship suite of award-winning international publications. We publish 20 titles under this imprint, many in continuous publication since 1929.


The journals cover a broad range of scientific disciplines and feature more than 2000 articles each year published on a state-of-the-art electronic platform. These award-winning, high-impact scientific and technical journals have an international readership in more than 175 countries.


In September 2010, the Press transitioned out of the National Research Council of Canada into an independent not-for-profit organization operating under the name Canadian Science Publishing. The new company retained its highly skilled staff and its editorial team comprising some of the world’s leading researchers, and today continues a long tradition of quality and innovation.


Canadian Science Publishing is an independent, not-for-profit scholarly publisher dedicated to serving the needs of researchers and their communities.Visit the Canadian Science Publishing website for more information about our organization, publishing services, support for societies, and other initiatives. 

NRC Research Press Resources

Exibindo 1 - 5 de 27
Library Resource
Artigos e Livros
Dezembro, 2016

Several federal- and state-sponsored programs, including cost-sharing arrangements, tax incentives, and technical assistance programs, are available to forestland owners, aiming to encourage desired forest management practices and outcomes. However, enrollment rates in such programs are low, and trends of forestland parcelization hint at an even smaller enrollment rate in the future. Therefore, it is important to understand how socioeconomic attributes of forestland owners and past experience with such programs affect the likelihood of enrollment in public incentive programs.

Library Resource
Artigos e Livros
Dezembro, 2015
Canadá

The boreal forest ecosystem is one of the largest frontier forests of the world, providing many ecological services to society. Boreal forests are also economically important, but forest harvesting and management become increasingly difficult when one moves from south to north in boreal environments. An approach was thus developed to assess the suitability of land units for timber production in a sustainable forest management (SFM) context in the northern boreal forest of Quebec (Canada).

Library Resource
Artigos e Livros
Dezembro, 2015
Canadá

We report estimates of the amount, distribution, and uncertainty of aboveground biomass (AGB) of the different ecoregions and forest land cover classes within the North American boreal forest, analyze the factors driving the error estimates, and compare our estimates with other reported values. A three-phase sampling strategy was used (i) to tie ground plot AGB to airborne profiling lidar metrics and (ii) to link the airborne estimates of AGB to ICESat-GLAS lidar measurements such that (iii) GLAS could be used as a regional sampling tool.

Library Resource
Artigos e Livros
Dezembro, 2015

Constraints of the physical environment affect forest growth and forest operations. At a local scale, these constraints are generally considered during forest operations. At regional or continental scales, they are often integrated to larger assessments of the potential for a given land unit to be managed. In this study, we propose an approach to analyze the integration of physical-environment constraints in forest management activities at the regional scale (482 000 km²).

Library Resource
Artigos e Livros
Dezembro, 2015
Canadá

The capacity of a forest stand to produce timber is related to the interactions that exist between its regeneration capacity, physical site characteristics (climate, surficial deposit, drainage), and disturbances. Minimally, to be sustainably managed, a forest needs to be sufficiently productive and able to regenerate after a disturbance so that its productive capacity is maintained or enhanced. To this effect, we evaluated timber productivity over a large area (175 000 km²) covering the latitudinal extent of closed-canopy black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P) forest.

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