Wiley-Blackwell | Land Portal
Wiley_Blackwell_Logo.gif

Ubicación

New Jersey
Estados Unidos
New Jersey US

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons. It was formed by the merger of John Wiley's Global Scientific, Technical, and Medical business with Blackwell Publishing, after Wiley took over the latter in 2007.[1]

As a learned society publisher, Wiley-Blackwell partners with around 750 societies and associations. It publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and more than 1,500 new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works, and laboratory protocols. Wiley-Blackwell is based in Hoboken, New Jersey (United States) and has offices in many international locations including Boston, OxfordChichester, Berlin, Singapore, Melbourne, Tokyo, and Beijing, among others.

Wiley-Blackwell publishes in a diverse range of academic and professional fields, including in biologymedicinephysical sciencestechnologysocial science, and the humanities.[2]

Access to more than 1,500 journals, OnlineBooks, lab protocols, electronic major reference works and other online products published by Wiley-Blackwell is available through Wiley Online Library,[3] which replaced the previous platform, Wiley InterScience, in August 2010.

Source: Wikipedia

Wiley-Blackwell Resources

Mostrando 1 - 10 de 374
Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Agosto, 2018
África austral, África

Empirical scientific evidence indicates that there is still room for increasing food production by improving land productivity. This study aimed at identifying the key determinants that govern farmers’ decisions to adopt multiple components of integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) in a maize mixed cropping system of the Chinyanja Triangle, Southern Africa.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2017

Wetlands are important providers of ecosystem services and key regulators of climate change. They positively contribute to global warming through their greenhouse gas emissions, and negatively through the accumulation of organic material in histosols, particularly in peatlands. Our understanding of wetlands’ services is currently constrained by limited knowledge on their distribution, extent, volume, interannual flood variability and disturbance levels.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Abril, 2017

Although REDD+ is approaching its 10th anniversary, major impacts in terms of reduced forest loss are hard to document. Conservation practitioners and scholars are therefore increasingly asking why REDD+ has not delivered more tangible results. A recent Comment in Conservation Biology by Fletcher et al. (2016) addresses this question. We agree with Fletcher et al. that REDD+ has been hyped in some circles, which has created unrealistic expectations among policy makers and forest dwellers alike. Yet, we argue that Fletcher et al.

Comparta esta página