World Resources Institute | Page 3 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
WRI
Focal point: 
Peter Veit

World Resources Institute

The World Resources Institute is a global environmental think tank that goes beyond research to put ideas into action. We work with governments, companies, and civil society to build solutions to urgent environmental challenges. WRI’s transformative ideas protect the earth and promote development because sustainability is essential to meeting human needs and fulfilling human aspirations in the future.

WRI spurs progress by providing practical strategies for change and effective tools to implement them. We measure our success in the form of new policies, products, and practices that shift the ways governments work, companies operate, and people act.

We operate globally because today’s problems know no boundaries. We are avid communicators because people everywhere are inspired by ideas, empowered by knowledge, and moved to change by greater understanding. We provide innovative paths to a sustainable planet through work that is accurate, fair, and independent.

World Resources Institute Resources

Mostrando 21 - 30 de 88
Library Resource
A Fair Share for Women: Toward More Equitable Land Compensation and Resettlement in Tanzania and Mozambique
Informes e investigaciones
Marzo, 2018
Mozambique, Tanzania

Tanzania and Mozambique — countries of vast mountain ranges and open stretches of plateaus — now face a growing land problem. As soil degradation, climate change and population growth place enormous strains on the natural resources that sustain millions of people, multinational companies are also gunning for large swaths of land across both countries. Caught between these pressures, many poor, rural communities get displaced or decide to sell their collectively held land.

Library Resource
A Fair Share for Women: Toward More Equitable Land Compensation and Resettlement in Tanzania and Mozambique cover image
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Marzo, 2018
Mozambique, Tanzania

Tanzania and Mozambique — countries of vast mountain ranges and open stretches of plateaus — now face a growing land problem. As soil degradation, climate change and population growth place enormous strains on the natural resources that sustain millions of people, multinational companies are also gunning for large swaths of land across both countries. Caught between these pressures, many poor, rural communities get displaced or decide to sell their collectively held land.

Library Resource
Recursos y herramientas de capacitación
Enero, 2018
Kenya

You can carry out your own analyses on poverty and ecosystem services with the GIS data made available, some of them being publicly released for the first time. All data are accompanied by metadata.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2017
Global

Almost one-quarter of the world’s land area has been degraded over the past 50 years because of soil erosion, salinization, peatland and wetland drainage, and forest degradation. The resulting damage, in terms of lost ecosystem goods and services, costs the world an estimated US$6.3 trillion a year. Almost a quarter of the world’s land area has been degraded over the past 50 years.
This is the result of soil erosion, salinization, peatland and wetland drainage, and forest degradation.

Library Resource
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Julio, 2017
Global
  • There is an accute lack of well-located urban housing that is adequate, secure, and affordable. The global affordable housing gap is currently estimated at 330 million urban households and is forecast to grow by more than 30 percent to 440 million households, or 1.6. billion people, by 2025.
  • This paper defines three key challenges to providing adequate, secure and affordable housing in the global south: the growth of informal or substandard settlements, the overemphasis on home ownership, and inappropriate policies or laws that push the poor out of the city.
Library Resource
Informes e investigaciones
Marzo, 2017
Camboya

Global demand for timber, agricultural commodities, and extractives is a significant driver of deforestation worldwide. Transparent land-concessions data for these large-scale commercial activities are essential to understand drivers of forest loss, monitor environmental impacts of ongoing activities, and ensure efficient and sustainable allocation of land.

Library Resource
Informes e investigaciones
Marzo, 2017
Brasil, Camboya, Canadá, Colombia, República Democrática del Congo, Indonesia, Liberia, Madagascar, Malasia, México, Myanmar, Papua Nueva Guinea, Perú, Rusia

Global demand for timber, agricultural commodities, and extractives is a significant driver of deforestation worldwide. Transparent land-concessions data for these large-scale commercial activities are essential to understand drivers of forest loss, monitor environmental impacts of ongoing activities, and ensure efficient and sustainable allocation of land.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2016
Bolivia, Brasil, Colombia

A large number of countries recognize the role of forests in carbon sequestration and committed in their NDCs to protect forests, reduce deforestation rates, and restore forestlands. Few NDCs, however, make any specific commitments to how their forests will be protected or restored on degraded land. It is still unclear if governments will protect forests by expanding the protected estate, improving the management of existing national parks, helping communities safeguard the forests on their lands, or by taking other measures.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2016
América central, América del Sur

Degraded lands—lands that have lost some degree of their natural productivity through human activity—account for over 20 percent of forest and agricultural lands in Latin America and the Caribbean. Some 300 million hectares of the region’s forests are considered degraded, and about 350 million hectares are now classified as deforested. The agriculture and forestry sectors are growing and exerting great pressure on natural areas. With the region expected to play an increasingly important role in global food security, this pressure will continue to ratchet up.

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