Raptor Research Foundation | Land Portal
Raptor Research Foundation logo
Acronym: 
RRF
Phone number: 
1-254-399-9636
Working languages: 
inglés

The Raptor Research Foundation (RRF) is a non-profit scientific society whose primary goal is the accumulation and dissemination of scientific information about raptors.

Following those horrific decades from the 1930s to the 1950s when most folks shot and poisoned raptors as “good-for-nothing chicken-hawks”, bird of prey populations were next subjected to a barrage of chemical abuses ranging from both the direct and indirect effects of pesticides and industrial by-products, e.g. organochlorines and organophosphates, polybrominated biphenyls, heavy metals and rodenticides. Unable to reproduce their numbers, several raptor species, e.g. peregrine falcons and bald eagles, teetered on the brink of extinction in the early 1970s. But it was not all bad news – there were also people out there who cared, i.e. falconers, academics, educators, rehabilitators, government biologists. And together, they organized an “army” to help birds of prey. That army today is called the Raptor Research Foundation (RRF).

Raptor Research Foundation Resources

Mostrando 1 - 7 de 7
Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2015
Estados Unidos de América

The northern Aplomado Falcon (Falco femoralis septentrionalis) inhabited the inland and coastal grasslands of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona until about 1930, when records of aplomados in the United States decreased. In 1986, the species was classified as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Among other recovery efforts, 102 birds were released from 2006 through 2011, in its former range in New Mexico at the Armendaris Ranch in the south–central portion of the state. To promote their survival, an extended supplemental feeding program was conducted.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2015

Energy and other anthropogenic development are increasing throughout the range of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in western North America, and both private and government agencies have expressed concern about indirect and direct effects on Golden Eagles. To facilitate sustainable development and reduce risk to Golden Eagles, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has established guidelines to assist developers in project planning and siting. A major component of environmental impact assessment is documenting Golden Eagle spatial use near a project site before development.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2015

We examined factors that potentially influenced reproductive success in Ferruginous Hawks (Buteo regalis) in the Uintah Basin, Utah, and determined whether oil and gas well development was one of those factors. For three breeding seasons (2002–2004), we measured the number of nestlings, fledglings, and dispersed young that were produced by pairs of Ferruginous Hawks nesting within 2365 km² managed by the Bureau of Land Management.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2014

Spatially explicit models depicting species occupancy offer a useful conservation tool for land managers. Using occurrence data collected in 2009 and 2010 from the Boise National Forest, Idaho, we developed distribution models for Flammulated Owls (Psiloscops flammeolus) and Northern Saw-whet Owls (Aegolius acadicus) to explore associations between habitat factors and owl occupancy. We then spatially applied these models in a Geographic Information System.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2014

Native animals are affected differently by urbanization. Some species respond favorably and thrive in human-dominated landscapes, but others are extirpated. Raptors are often sensitive to changes in land cover and prey abundance. We therefore used a combination of broadcast surveys and incidental observations while spot-mapping to evaluate the influences of these two variables on the presence of raptors at 21 sites from 2004–2008 along an urban-to-wildland gradient in western Washington, U.S.A.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2013

The diet of the Eurasian Eagle-Owl (Bubo bubo) was studied in two different land-cover types: wetlands and non-wetlands. We analyzed 1458 prey items obtained from 924 pellets and 534 prey remains collected in 34 territories in west-central Korea. Diet composition differed significantly between the two habitats: diet was mainly birds (68.9% by number; 85.3% by biomass) in wetlands, but was dominated by mammals (38.7% by number; 64.7% by biomass) in non-wetlands.

Library Resource
Artículos de revistas y libros
Diciembre, 2012

Little is known about the habitat and ecology of suburban Barred Owls (Strix varia), a species sometimes considered the nocturnal equivalent of Red-shouldered Hawks (Buteo lineatus). We compared nesting habitat of Barred Owls to that of Red-shouldered Hawks nesting in suburban and urban areas, in and near the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, to determine whether any features distinguished owl nest sites from hawk nest sites.

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