World Resources Institute | Land Portal
Acronym: 
WRI
Focal point: 
Peter Veit

The World Resources Institute is a global environmental think tank that goes beyond research to put ideas into action. We work with governments, companies, and civil society to build solutions to urgent environmental challenges. WRI’s transformative ideas protect the earth and promote development because sustainability is essential to meeting human needs and fulfilling human aspirations in the future.

WRI spurs progress by providing practical strategies for change and effective tools to implement them. We measure our success in the form of new policies, products, and practices that shift the ways governments work, companies operate, and people act.

We operate globally because today’s problems know no boundaries. We are avid communicators because people everywhere are inspired by ideas, empowered by knowledge, and moved to change by greater understanding. We provide innovative paths to a sustainable planet through work that is accurate, fair, and independent.

World Resources Institute Resources

Mostrando 1 - 10 de 59
Informes e investigaciones
Enero 2019
Global

Almost one-quarter of the world’s land area has been degraded over the past 50 years because of soil erosion, salinization, peatland and wetland drainage, and forest degradation. The resulting damage, in terms of lost ecosystem goods and services, costs the world an estimated US$6.3 trillion a year.

Conference Papers & Reports
Enero 2019
Global

Across the world, companies with a wide range of business models are making money from planting trees. These restoration enterprises are proving that restoring degraded forests and agricultural lands is not only good for the planet, but a good business opportunity as well.

 

Informes e investigaciones
Julio 2018
África

Indigenous and community lands, crucial for rural livelihoods, are typically held under informal customary arrangements. This can leave the land vulnerable to outside commercial interests, so communities may seek to formalize their land rights in a government registry and obtain an official land document.

Informes e investigaciones
Julio 2018
África
América Latina y el Caribe
Asia

Increasing global demand for natural resources is intensifying competition for land across the developing world, pushing companies onto territories that many Indigenous Peoples and rural communities have sustainably managed for genera

The Scramble for Land Rights cover image
Informes e investigaciones
Julio 2018
Global

Increasing global demand for natural resources is intensifying competition for land across the developing world, pushing companies onto territories that many Indigenous Peoples and rural communities have sustainably managed for generations.

A Fair Share for Women: Toward More Equitable Land Compensation and Resettlement in Tanzania and Mozambique
Informes e investigaciones
Marzo 2018
Mozambique
Tanzania

Tanzania and Mozambique — countries of vast mountain ranges and open stretches of plateaus — now face a growing land problem. As soil degradation, climate change and population growth place enormous strains on the natural resources that sustain millions of people, multinational companies are also gunning for large swaths of land across both countries.

A Fair Share for Women: Toward More Equitable Land Compensation and Resettlement in Tanzania and Mozambique cover image
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Marzo 2018
Mozambique
Tanzania

Tanzania and Mozambique — countries of vast mountain ranges and open stretches of plateaus — now face a growing land problem. As soil degradation, climate change and population growth place enormous strains on the natural resources that sustain millions of people, multinational companies are also gunning for large swaths of land across both countries.

Training Resources & Tools
Enero 2018
Kenya

You can carry out your own analyses on poverty and ecosystem services with the GIS data made available, some of them being publicly released for the first time. All data are accompanied by metadata.

Documentos de política y resúmenes
Julio 2017
Global
  • There is an accute lack of well-located urban housing that is adequate, secure, and affordable. The global affordable housing gap is currently estimated at 330 million urban households and is forecast to grow by more than 30 percent to 440 million households, or 1.6. billion people, by 2025.

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