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How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 Abril 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzânia

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

Maasai herder on the flooded Mundarara road, northern Tanzania
30 Janeiro 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
África
Tanzânia
Ásia
Mongólia
Global

I write this blog as our project team embarks on a fifth year of work on women’s land tenure security (WOLTS) with pastoral communities in mining-affected areas of Mongolia and Tanzania. Just before Christmas 2019, we were in Mundarara village in northern Tanzania. Exceptionally heavy rains made getting around much more challenging than usual. Locals travelling on foot had to make wide detours to avoid getting bogged down in waterlogged grazing land, and it took everyone much longer to get to the village primary school for our long-planned training day. 

IMG-20170130-WA0019.jpg
23 Outubro 2019
África subsariana
Burúndi
Tanzânia

Date: 18 octobre 2019

Source: IWACU

Par: Léandre Sikuyavuga

Promoting Land Grabs, Increasing Inequality
7 Junho 2019
Authors: 
Scott Schang
Moçambique
Tanzânia
Global

In the past decade, significant international attention focused on “land grabs” in developing countries by companies and others hungry for land to grow food and procure resources for the world’s growing population.

27 Maio 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Michael Odhiambo
África
Quênia
Sudão do Sul
Tanzânia
Uganda

The land sector is in the throes of the Global Data Revolution, which, of course, has created opportunities as well as challenges.  Government data portals, open access academic journals, community mapping and other citizen-generated data initiatives create possibilities for inclusive and open approaches to data collection and management.  But how can these opportunities be leveraged for real change and benefits to citizens?

4 Dezembro 2018
Authors: 
Ms. Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka
Tanzânia
El Salvador
Paquistão
Global

Rural women and girls are far from the public or media spotlight, but their struggles deserve urgent attention

17 Outubro 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Malcolm Childress
Tanzânia
Colômbia
Índia
Global

Until today, the world had no internationally comparable data on citizens’ perceptions of the security their property rights; no way of tracking how people evaluated the likelihood of their home or other land being taken from them.

Women farmers use sticks to make holes in the soil for seeds, on a farm near Pangalengan, West Java, Indonesia, May 9, 2018. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside
28 Setembro 2018
Authors: 
Lukasz Czerwinski
África
Tanzânia
América Latina e Caribe
Brasil
Sudeste Asiático
Índia

In a saturated marketplace, food and beverage companies too often avoid addressing land rights issues.

women farm africa
8 Agosto 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Amani Mhinda
Tanzânia
Global

Sextortion: referring to a form of blackmail in which sexual information or images are used to extort sexual favors from the victim. One of the biggest challenges for those working in the land and natural resources sector, has been drawing attention to the fact that this happens in our sector, too and most importantly, that something needs to be done about it. 

25 Abril 2018
Authors: 
Jim Grabham
Tanzânia

By Jim Grabham (Mokoro Ltd, UK) with Ezekiel Kereri (HakiMadini, Tanzania), team members of the global Women’s Land Tenure Security (WOLTS) project.

30 Março 2018
Authors: 
Fred Nelson
Makko Sinandei
Tanzânia

Northern Tanzania’s iconic savannah landscapes, home to some of the greatest cultural and biological diversity found anywhere in the world, encapsulate many of the challenges and opportunities facing community land rights in Africa. In contrast to most African countries, Tanzania’s landmark 1999 land reforms provide full legal recognition of customary land rights, which are administered through elected village councils.

Mama Neema stands at the entrance of her traditional boma (homestead) where she built three houses for her family in Kimokouwa village in Arusha, Tanzania UN WOMEN
2 Março 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Godfrey Massay
Tanzânia

In the effort to address global sustainability challenges affecting people, prosperity, and planet, in 2015, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted by the global community to replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). SDGs have recognized women’s land rights as opposed to its predecessor, MDGs. Of over 230 indicators, three are on women’s land rights and seven are generally on land rights.

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