A linkage between the biophysical and the economic: Assessing the global market impacts of soil erosion | Land Portal

Información del recurso

Date of publication: 
Julio 2019
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
lupj:S0264837718319343
Pages: 
15
License of the resource: 

Employing a linkage between a biophysical and an economic model, this study estimates the economic impact of soil erosion by water on the world economy. The global biophysical model estimates soil erosion rates, which are converted into land productivity losses and subsequently inserted into a global market simulation model. The headline result is that soil erosion by water is estimated to incur a global annual cost of eight billion US dollars to global GDP. The concomitant impact on food security is to reduce global agri-food production by 33.7 million tonnes with accompanying rises in agri-food world prices of 0.4%–3.5%, depending on the food product category. Under pressure to use more marginal land, abstracted water volumes are driven upwards by an estimated 48 billion cubic meters. Finally, there is tentative evidence that soil erosion is accelerating the competitive shifts in comparative advantage on world agri-food markets.

Autores y editores

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

Sartori, Martina
Philippidis, George
Ferrari, Emanuele
Borrelli, Pasquale
Lugato, Emanuele
Montanarella, Luca
Panagos, Panos

Publisher(s): 

Land Use Policy is an international and interdisciplinary journal concerned with the social, economic, political, legal, physical and planning aspects of urban and rural land use. It provides a forum for the exchange of ideas and information from the diverse range of disciplines and interest groups which must be combined to formulate effective land use policies.

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