Mainstreaming Gender in Tanzania’s Local Land Governance | Land Portal | Asegurando los Derechos a la Tierra a través de Datos Abiertos
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Información del recurso

Date of publication: 
Diciembre 2016
Resource Language: 
Pages: 
20
License of the resource: 
Copyright details: 
t © International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)

Despite progressive provisions on gender equality in Tanzania’s land laws, women have little representation in land allocation decisions, including meetings of village councils and village assemblies. Mainstreaming gender in local regulations can help to address this problem.

The Tanzania Women Lawyers Association (TAWLA), in partnership with the World Resources Institute (WRI) and Lawyers’ Environmental Action Team (LEAT), developed model by-laws to improve women’s participation in local-level decision-making on village land management. This initiative took place in Kidugalo and Vilabwa, two villages in the Kisarawe district. The model by-laws were developed through a bottom-up, participatory process, and include explicit provisions to promote meaningful participation by women in village-level decision making.

This report outlines the processes followed to develop the by-laws, the results so far, lessons learned and prospects for scaling up.

Autores y editores

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Tanzania Women Lawyers Association (TAWLA) is an NGO founded in 1989 and officially registered in 1990. The founding members comprised a professional group of women lawyers who felt the need for an organization that could promote an environment guaranteeing equal rights and access to all by focusing on vulnerable and marginalised groups especially women and children. The founding members also recognised the need for women lawyers to foster mutual support for each other in professional advancement and social responsibility. TAWLA has more than 570 members

Publisher(s): 
logo

Tanzania Women Lawyers Association (TAWLA) is an NGO founded in 1989 and officially registered in 1990. The founding members comprised a professional group of women lawyers who felt the need for an organization that could promote an environment guaranteeing equal rights and access to all by focusing on vulnerable and marginalised groups especially women and children. The founding members also recognised the need for women lawyers to foster mutual support for each other in professional advancement and social responsibility. TAWLA has more than 570 members

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