African Crop Science Society | Land Portal
Acronym: 
ACSS

Emplacement

Ouganda
UG
Working languages: 
anglais

The African Crop Science Society (ACSS) was established in 1993 with overall goal of promoting crop production and food security in Africa. The general objectives embedded in the society’s constitution are to:

  • foster and promote the study of crops in all its facets by creating opportunities for the free exchange
  • foster liaison between the society and other bodies with common or similar interests both in Africa and abroad
  • obtain and disseminate knowledge, information and ideas pertaining to crops by means of deliberations and publications
  • promote the work and interests of members of the profession
  • promote collaboration among the national and regional crop science societies in Africa
  • encourage scientific training in crop science
  • promote a general awareness of utilising, protecting and conserving the environment
  • fulfill any other function that may be in the interests of crop science.

Generally, the activities of the society include: the convening of congresses, symposia, workshops and training courses; publication of the African Crop Science Journal; publication of regular Newsletters; and organising meetings.

African Crop Science Society Resources

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Library Resource
Publication évaluée par des pairs
décembre, 2013
Ouganda, Afrique orientale

Land degradation is severe in the steep sloping highlands in eastern Africa; natural resource management is central to good governance and increasing enfranchisement of rural people. Devolution, the transfer of roles, responsibilities and rights of natural resource management to institutions and communities has proved effective in accelerating adoption of sustainable land management (SLM) innovations beyond pilot sites. The SLM technologies practiced in the area include the use of trenches, contour bunds, terraces and agro forestry.

Library Resource
Publication évaluée par des pairs
décembre, 2013
Éthiopie, Ouganda

Key challenges encountered while operationalizing the African Highlands Initiative (AHI) devolution model are linked to coordination management, with issues arising out of collaboration processes. Capacity at local government level is weak and characterized by high turnover of staff. Joint visioning, planning, budgeting, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, are essential. Team building skills, leadership, and systems thinking are required.

Library Resource
Publication évaluée par des pairs
décembre, 2013
Éthiopie, Ouganda

Scaling up is not just about technology transfer but a critical understanding of the needs and visions of farmers as well. Despite the success of pilot projects for Integrated Natural Resource Management implemented in the study area, effect and uptake of the pilot tested innovations have been insignificant. This study assesses implications of adopting Innovative Platforms (IP) as a means of accelerating uptake and utilization of sustainable land management (SLM) technologies in the highlands of eastern Uganda.

Library Resource
Publication évaluée par des pairs
décembre, 2013
Éthiopie

Use of inorganic fertilizers could be fundamental in addressing low and declining soil fertility while improving food security in sub-Sahara Africa. Determination of key factors responsible for use of inorganic fertilizers in the central highlands of Ethiopia is increasingly important as continued land redistribution in already degraded and land-scarce highlands undermines sustainable farming and increases nutrient mining.

Library Resource
Publication évaluée par des pairs
décembre, 2013
Éthiopie, Ouganda, Afrique orientale

Fostering collective action is necessary for scaling sustainable land management (SLM) innovations. This paper analyses the significance of social networks in SLM among agricultural rural communities in central Ethiopia and eastern Uganda. Social networks facilitate collective action important for small-scale resource-poor farmers, who tend to rely more on informal sources of information, as well as for women farmers, whose information needs are often not addressed by formal extension services.

Library Resource
Publication évaluée par des pairs
décembre, 2013
Ouganda

The objective was to determine the influence of market access or lack of it, on farmer investment in soil and water conservation (SWC) technologies in the highlands of eastern Uganda. Linking farmers to better markets for their agricultural commodities would contribute to raising their incomes and motivate farmers’ adoption of conservation in SWC technologies. Areas of relatively high agricultural potential but remote from major markets face disincentives; when farmers are unable to transport produce to markets on time, they are left in the hands of middlemen who dictate low prices.

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