TMP Systems | Page 2 | Land Portal
Acronym: 
TMP

Ubicación

66 High Street
BN7 1XG Lewes
Reino Unido
GB

TMP Systems is a boutique consultancy based in the United Kingdom, with staff in the United States and the Philippines. Our work spans asset management, commercial investment systems design in carbon, energy and land use and environmental, social and governance diligence.


We draw on our team’s comprehensive systems architecture, technology and sustainability experience in developed and emerging markets to solve complex problems in these sectors. The solutions we provide depend on the problems we are called on to address; examples are available above under our three business lines: Asset Management, Climate & Ecosystems and Economic Development.


Our client base stretches from the United States and Europe to Brazil, Indonesia and Kenya and includes asset managers, governments, research institutions, foundations and civil society organizations. References are available upon request. Our asset management work is protected under confidentiality agreements, but anonymized samples can be provided where appropriate.  

TMP Systems Resources

Mostrando 6 - 10 de 19
Library Resource
QTR brief - Sugar cover
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Febrero, 2019
África, África subsahariana
New research by the Quantifying Tenure Risk (QTR) initiative finds that land disputes in the African sugar sector often cause long and costly delays, with 46% of disputes lasting over 10 years. Half of these are still unresolved today. In serious cases disputes close projects down, causing reputational damage to companies and investors involved, and up to $100.9 million in foregone revenue. 
 
Library Resource
QTR brief - Palm Oil cover
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Febrero, 2019
África, África subsahariana
Depending on the size and location of their investment, oil palm producers and investors risk losing between $8.3 and $22.1 million due to operational delays caused by active land tenure disputes. These numbers have emerged from the Tenure Risk Tool (TRT), a due diligence tool designed by the Quantifying Tenure Risk (QTR) initiative to help businesses understand their exposure to tenure risk in sub-Saharan Africa. 
 
This brief shares findings from TRT analysis using data collected from palm oil producers in Liberia, Uganda and Côte d’Ivoire. 
Library Resource
QTR brief - The Tenure Risk Tool
Documentos de política y resúmenes
Febrero, 2019
África, África subsahariana
Tenure disputes – or disputes over claims to land and natural resources – are endemic in emerging market agricultural land investments.  

 

In this brief, the Quantifying Tenure Risk (QTR) initiative give an overview of key findings from their new research into the costs associated with land tenure dispute in Africa, and present the Tenure Risk Tool, a discounted cashflow model created to help investors avoid harmful investments.
Library Resource
Ghana palm oil development, taken on 11 September 2013 in Ghana near Amantia Asuotwene. Photo by Jbdodane.
Recursos y herramientas de capacitación
Febrero, 2019
África, África subsahariana

New research by the Quantifying Tenure Risk (QTR) initiative has revealed that land disputes can cause losses of up to $101 million across a range of agricultural projects in Africa, while at the same time causing significant harm and stress to local communities who have a claim to the land.

In response, the initiative has developed a new publicly available economic modelling tool to accurately determine the potential cost of a dispute in a bid to help companies avoid harmful investments. 

Library Resource
QTR report 2019 - front cover
Informes e investigaciones
Febrero, 2019
África, África subsahariana

Tenure risk – or the risk of dispute between investors and local people over land or natural resource claims – is endemic in emerging markets. There are hundreds of recorded incidents of tenure disputes creating delays, violence, project cancellation and even bankruptcy at a corporate level. These tenure disputes create lose-lose outcomes for investors, local people and national governments while robbing emerging markets of the developmental benefits of responsible land investments.

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