Land governance by country

The country pages provide a comprehensive space, where avid learners can come to explore and gain a better understanding of land governance issues in various countries around the world.

Much of the information here below has been developed in collaboration with local partner organizations and contains comprehensive data and information.  

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Albania image by Michaela DunkelBunt

Albania has significant natural resources, including fertile agricultural land, an Adriatic/Ionian coastline, abundant water resources with hydropower potential and valuable mineral deposits. Since the fall of communism in 1991, the country has made significant progress toward establishing a multi-party democracy and has implemented numerous economic reforms. Albania‘s economy is one of the fastest growing in Europe (averaging 5.5% in the 2006 – 2009 period) and the percentage of the population living in poverty fell from 25% in 2002 to 12% in 2008.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Albania.

Land tenure in Angola has been strongly affected by 27 years of civil war that disrupted customary rights and land allocation while forcing rural communities from their land. As a consequence, agricultural production strongly declined, the country became dependent on imports and humanitarian aid to feed its population and more than half of the population (57%) moved from rural to urban areas, concentrated in informal settlements without adequate services.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Angola.

Since 1966, after independence, Botswana has become a relatively stable and prosperous country where the population has access to clean water, education and health care. 58% of the population lives in urban areas, while the rest lives in rural areas characterized by a low level of production and income (97% of all poor live in rural areas) due to the harsh climatic conditions, limited arable land and fragile ecosystems.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Botswana.

Burkina Faso picture CIFOR

Located in Western Africa, Burkina Faso is a landlocked country to the north of Ghana. Eighty percent of the population is rural, making a living primarily through agriculture, livestock and forestry on small family farms. Cotton is the main cash crop, and cotton and gold are the country’s main exports. The country is subject to endemic droughts, which along with land use changes, population pressures, and land tenure insecurity have contributed to food shortages. Almost half of the population lives in poverty.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Burkina Faso.

Central African Republic photo DFID

The Central African Republic is a sparsely populated country well-endowed with natural resources –land, forests and minerals – that could have accelerated the country’s development. However, the political instability in the Central African Republic has prevented the construction of infrastructure and basic services such as hospitals and schools.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in the Central African Republic.

Chad is the fifth largest African country, with a population of about 11 million people, 73% of them living in rural areas and 27% in urban areas. The country is rich in oil resources and in recent years it experienced an increase of revenues thanks to the oil production. However, Chad remains one of the poorest countries in Africa.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Chad.

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