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Land governance by country

Explore land rights and governance issues using the filters below, and browse our collection of 60+ country portfolios developed in collaboration with local researchers from around the world.

Displaying 1 - 12 of 70

Afghanistan

Due to decades of political and economic instability, the management and ownership of land in Afghanistan is complex, characterized by insecure land rights and extensive land conflict. Approximately one quarter to one third of rural

Albania

Albania has significant natural resources, including fertile agricultural land, an Adriatic/Ionian coastline, abundant water resources with hydropower potential and valuable mineral deposits. Since the fall of communism in 1991, the

Angola

Land tenure in Angola has been strongly affected by 27 years of civil war that disrupted customary rights and land allocation while forcing rural communities from their land. As a consequence, agricultural production strongly declined,

Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a densely populated country with a population of 163 million and a total land area of 147,570 km2. Arable land (hectares per person) in Bangladesh was last measured at 0.05 in 2011.

Bolivia

Land has always been a fundamental issue in Bolivia. It is the backbone of demands by the country’s peasant and indigenous movements. Thus, it also has been part of government programs and of other national actors´ agendas.

Botswana

Since 1966, after independence, Botswana has become a relatively stable and prosperous country where the population has access to clean water, education and health care. 58% of the population lives in urban areas, while the rest lives

Brazil

Brazil has one of the most advanced legal frameworks in Latin America and the Caribbean region (LAC) related to the recognition of land and property rights.

Burkina Faso

Located in Western Africa, Burkina Faso is a landlocked country to the north of Ghana. Eighty percent of the population is rural, making a living primarily through agriculture, livestock and forestry on small family farms. Cotton is the

Burundi

Burundi‘s history of political conflict over the last 50 years has revolved in large measure around issues of access to land for agriculture. 91% of the total land is classified as agricultural land and the majority of Burundi’s

Cambodia

Land lies at the center of debates about Cambodia’s socio-economic development. Despite urbanization tendencies, agriculture remains the main source of income for over three quarter of the population. For farmers in the fertile lowlands

Cameroon

Despite the abundance of its natural resources, in Cameroon 40% of the population is poor, especially women and children, and concentrated in rural areas.

Central African Republic

The Central African Republic is a sparsely populated country well-endowed with natural resources –land, forests and minerals – that could have accelerated the country’s development. However, the political instability in the Central