This indicators measures the country-level extension (in sq. Km) of the "remote rangelands" anthrome class, which includes rangelands without significantl human population. According to Ellis et Al., (2011), anthrome classes ranges from wildlands - with little antrhropogenic impact on the ecosystem - to dense human settlements - in which the anthropogenic impact is maximum. This indicator is part of the Anthropogenic Biomes of the World (Version 2).

Full data and additional information are available via this link:
http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/data/set/anthromes-anthropogenic-biomes...

Full citation for the data included here is:
Ellis, E.C., K.K. Goldewijk, S. Siebert, D. Lightman, and N. Ramankutty. 2013. Anthropogenic Biomes of the World, Version 2: 2000. Palisades, NY: NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC). http://dx.doi.org/10.7927/H4D798B9.

For more information about anthrome classes, please visit:
http://ecotope.org/anthromes/v2/
Or consult:
Ellis, E. C., K. Klein Goldewijk, S. Siebert, D. Lightman, and N. Ramankutty. 2010. Anthropogenic transformation of the biomes, 1700 to 2000. Global Ecology and Biogeography 19(5):589-606. Available at: http://ecotope.org/people/ellis/papers/ellis_2010.pdf

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This indicators measures the country-level extension (in sq. Km) of the "remote rangelands" anthrome class, which includes rangelands without significantl human population.

Measurement unit: 
Sq Km
Data provider: 
Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center
Copyright details: 

Data sets and related data products and services are provided by SEDAC managed by the NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. SEDAC is one of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), part of the ESDIS project. NASA data are freely accessible; however, when you publish these data or works based on the data, we request that you cite the data sets within the text of the publication and include a reference to them in your reference list. References to data sets, like the examples, below, should have enough detail to provide readers of your publication with the ability to obtain the data sets and conduct their own studies based on your work. (For complete provenance and understanding of specifically which parts of data were used and how, it also may be necessary to describe in detail, within the body of the publication, exactly how the data were used.) Examples of data set citations are included below. Read more about this.

Indicator details

Measurement unit: 
Sq Km
Best value is: 
High

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