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mozambique-80752_1280
15 October 2020
Authors: 
Simon Norfolk
Maria Muianga
Mozambique

This is the story of how dozens of communities in Mozambique are mapping and documenting their own land rights. "A New Hope" is the winner of the Land Portal's Second Data Story Contest, and is authored by the team at Terra Firma Mozambique.  

 

Carla León Celaya
14 September 2020
Authors: 
Dolene Miller
Latin America and the Caribbean
Central America
Nicaragua
Foto: Ingrid Ãgohó Pataxó
17 September 2020
Authors: 
Celia Xacriabá
Latin America and the Caribbean
South America
Brazil
4 August 2020
Authors: 
Ms. Karol Boudreaux
Global

Supporting women’s ability to own, manage and control land will help accelerate gender equality globally

It is depressing, discouraging, infuriating – pick your word – to see the scale and scope of abuse and discrimination aimed at women and girls worldwide.

4 August 2020
Authors: 
Omaira Bolanos
Latin America and the Caribbean

Many Latin American countries recognize the property rights of indigenous and Afro-descendant people, but those laws do little to protect women’s access to land

Latin America’s indigenous and Afro-descendant communities are facing not just one pandemic, but three. Women bear the brunt of them all, which threatens communities’ very survival.

Young champions – hope for Mongolia’s herding traditions
27 July 2020
Authors: 
Ms. Suvd Boldbaatar
Mongolia

“It's hard to find the right life partner in my soum (district). Most of the girls went to school, then to university in the city. Not many of them are good at herding.” 

Like most young women who grew up in the city, I usually think of herders as quiet men with closed faces that are wrinkled and burnt by the sun. Khuukhenduu Naranbold is quite the opposite. He is smooth-skinned with an open face and a big smile. Even though he is only 23 years old, he is self-confident and keen to talk.  

Khuukhenduu’s comments about marriage and herding were recorded in 2016 at the beginning of a five-year action research project on women’s land tenure security, called WOLTS. The project has focused on pastoralist communities affected by mining, and has involved repeated visits and evidence gathering in several communities in Mongolia and Tanzania. I have been a part of the WOLTS team since June 2016.

Khuukhenduu comes from Dalanjargalan in the Gobi Desert – an area of Mongolia where the traditional herding lifestyle is under threat, not only from mining but also because many young herder men are struggling to marry. This is because boys, especially in herding families, are expected to look after the family’s animals, while girls are more likely to finish school and go to university. Once the girls leave to study in the city, few want to return to the harsh herding lifestyle.

Although it is difficult to find a partner, Khuukhenduu is not unhappy. He is a keen horseman and very proud of his riding skills. He is a member of the Mongolian Federation of Horse Racing and Trainers, and he loves racing. Unlike most other herders, who have adopted Chinese motorcycles and modern clothes, he still herds his animals on horseback and often wears a beautiful red deel (traditional costume). 

However the nomadic herding life is difficult, and, although he lives in his own ger (traditional felted tent), Khuukhenduu stays close to his parents so that taking care of animals can be shared. At the same time, he uses social media to keep in touch with his school friends – and with girls.

This contrast between tradition and modern technology illustrates the tensions and rapid changes taking place in today’s herding lifestyle. Khuukhenduu has profound knowledge of nature and how to successfully make a living from the land. He also embraces the internet, and was an eager participant in our WOLTS training programme this year on gender, land rights and the law.

In his small community in Dalanjargalan, Khuukhenduu is already well known. Although he does not have high academic qualifications, he is a skilled manager who knows how to maintain pastureland and raise quality livestock. He is also a confident speaker and a natural leader, so it is not surprising that older participants in the WOLTS programme selected him to become a community champion on gender and land. In some ways in his everyday life he is just like a CEO – taking responsibility, always having to think about the future and plan for both the good times and the bad, while constantly carrying out a whole range of highly skilled herding activities.  

Mongolian masculinity is celebrated in July every year in the Naadam festival of the three ‘manly sports’ of horse riding, wrestling and archery. Khuukhenduu is a participant and fierce competitor in Naadam games – especially horse racing. But his skills, grounded in the country’s herding traditions, will be lost unless the country and the government support nomadic families to thrive. 

I often worry that our country does not put sufficient value on the traditional knowledge and skills of herding people. If the herders go, Mongolia will lose centuries of experience in sustainable land and animal management. If Khuukhenduu struggles to marry and raise a family, what hope is there for other young herders? 

The herding life is not for everyone, but I know that city life also has its problems. I also realise that knowledge often comes from life’s experiences, not only from books and university. As Mongolia looks for ways to develop new industries we need to remember our proud nomadic heritage and make sure we protect herders’ land rights, not only to support tourism but – most importantly – as the foundation for so many Mongolian families’ lives. As trained and respected community champions, thoughtful young leaders like Khuukhenduu are the very people who offer us hope for the future.

 

 

Picture credit. Nadiko Lopei Alim a pastoralist from Kapese inTurkana, Northern Kenya. Trócaire is working on resource rights and community engagement to mitigate the risk of conflict related to the extractives industry in Turkana. (Photo by Garry Walsh)
7 July 2020
Authors: 
Barbara van Paassen
Magdalena Anna Kropiwnicka
Global

For those of us who have worked in development since quite some time certain stories have become a little too familiar.  Whether in Latin America, South East Asia or Sub Saharan Africa, it is women and their special connection to land and water that are greatly impacted when the thirsty mining, hydropower or agribusiness industries move into their communities.  The stories tell of loss of access to land and forests, of contamination of the water used for drinking, cooking and bathing; of the much longer and more dangerous journeys to get water and the increased vulnerability to sextortion and gender-based violence.  

Land Governance in Ethiopia in the Time of COVID-19
26 June 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Ziade Hailu
Ethiopia

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Adecru - Acção Académica Para O Desenvolvimento Das Comunidades Rurai

MISSION

Boost the focus of citizen conscience and sovereign agenda for local development promoting greater involvement and interaction between various national and international actors in favor of solidary and fair development of communities.

 

VISION

Rural Communities more actives in setting up priorities, definition, implementation and evaluation of action for their own development

Organização internacional que trabalha por justiça social, igualdade de gênero e pelo fim da pobreza. Fomos fundados em 1972 e estamos presentes em 45 países, alcançando mais de 15 milhões de pessoas no mundo. No Brasil desde 1999, atuamos em mais de 2.4 mil comunidades e beneficiamos mais de 300 mil pessoas. Trabalhamos em parceria com comunidades e organizações locais em projetos de educação, agroecologia e clima, igualdade de gênero e participação e democracia.

ActionAid is an international anti-poverty agency whose aim is to fight poverty worldwide. Formed in 1972, for over 30 years we have been growing and expanding to where we are today - helping over 13 million of the world's poorest and most disadvantaged people in 42 countries worldwide.

Agrisud International logo

Entreprendre contre la pauvreté

 

Nous tous, chez Agrisud, n’acceptons pas l’idée qu’aujourd’hui 1,4 milliards de personnes puissent vivre en situation de pauvreté, avec le plus souvent de grandes difficultés pour se nourrir quotidiennement.

Au Sud comme au Nord, nous savons que cette situation est due très souvent à l’exclusion économique, pour des raisons multiples, qui elle-même entraîne progressivement l’exclusion sociale.

Nous sommes convaincus qu’une des réponses à cette situation est de faire revenir ces personnes dans le circuit économique.

 

The All-China Women's Federation (ACWF) was founded on April 3, 1949. It is a mass organization that unites Chinese women of all ethnic groups and from all walks of life, and strives for their liberation and development. The mission of ACWF is to represent and uphold women's rights and interests, and to promote equality between women and men.

Anuario Antropologico

Anuário Antropológico (Anuário Antropológico)

Anuário Antropológico é uma revista semestral do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Antropologia Social da Universidade de Brasília (PPGAS/UnB). Publica artigos originais, ensaios bibliográficos, resenhas, críticas e outros textos de natureza acadêmica que apresentem pesquisas empíricas de qualidade, diálogos teóricos relevantes e perspectivas analíticas diversas. A Revista publica textos em português, inglês, espanhol ou francês.Os artigos selecionados pela comissão editorial são submetidos a pareceristas externos em regime de anonimato.

APWLD developed from dialogues among Asia Pacific women lawyers, social scientists and activists, which began at the 1985 Third World Forum on Women, held in Nairobi, Kenya. The women participating in the dialogues recognised that while law is used as an instrument of state control over resources, rights and even women’s bodies, it can also be used to help effect political and socio-economic changes in our societies.

Asian Rural Women's Coalition (ARWC)

Borne of the women's continued resistance against imperialist globalization was the Asian Rural Women's Regional Consultation held in the Philippines in 2007 (of 52 Asian women from 14 countries) followed by the Asian Rural Women's Conference in 2008 held in Arakkonam, Tamil Nadu, India.

Asian Women

Asian Women is the official journal of the Research Institute of Asian
Women. The journal is published in March, June, September, and
December each year.
Asian Womenis supported by Sookmyung Women's University and the National Research Foundation of Korea Grant funded by the Korean Government (MOE).

Asociación para el Desarrollo de la Mujer Negra Costarricense logo

El Centro de Mujeres Afrocostarricenses nace en1992 en Limón, Costa Rica como una iniciativa política de mujeres afrocostarricenses que se plantearon trabajar con temas específicos relacionados con su condición de género y raza, así como con un trabajo intensivo con la población Afrocostarricense y de la comunidad en general.Reconociéndonos como ciudadanas costarricenses, las mujeres fundadoras del Centro se plantearon la necesidad de contribuir activamente en la construcción de sociedades justas sin discriminación de ningún tipo. Desde su fundación y debido a la identidad afrodescendiente

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