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Maasai herder on the flooded Mundarara road, northern Tanzania
30 January 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
Africa
Tanzania
Asia
Mongolia
Global

I write this blog as our project team embarks on a fifth year of work on women’s land tenure security (WOLTS) with pastoral communities in mining-affected areas of Mongolia and Tanzania. Just before Christmas 2019, we were in Mundarara village in northern Tanzania. Exceptionally heavy rains made getting around much more challenging than usual. Locals travelling on foot had to make wide detours to avoid getting bogged down in waterlogged grazing land, and it took everyone much longer to get to the village primary school for our long-planned training day. 

21 November 2019
Authors: 
Mr. ODENDA LUMUMBA
Africa

Next week the Conference on Land Policy in Africa - Winning the Fight against Corruption in the Land Sector: Sustainable Pathway for Africa’s Transformation, will take place in Abidjan. The African Union recognises that corruption is a key factor hampering efforts at promoting governance, socio-economic transformation, peace and security, and the enjoyment of human rights in the Member States.

Global Witness: Find the fact, change the story, expose the system.
26 September 2018
Authors: 
Gillian Caldwell
Global
We are facing challenges in our collective efforts to ensure that land rights are respected around the world. We are fighting the odds with ever more powerful companies and governments surrounding us. And these forces are all too often working in collusion to drive business forward with a profit at any price mentality  -- and at the expense of human rights and the environment.
community-investor negotiation guide
20 September 2018
Authors: 
Ms. Rachael Knight
Kaitlin Cordes
Global

Deciding whether or not to allow an investor to use community lands and natural resources is one of the most important decisions a community can make. Namati and the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment (CCSI) have published two new guides to help communities prepare for interactions with investors and, if they so wish, negotiate fair, equitable contracts. These guides are the first of their kind.

14 August 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Malcolm Childress
Honduras
Global

Malcolm Childress visited Honduras in April as part of a fact-finding and speaking delegation sponsored by the US State Department.

On the northern coast of Honduras, palm forests give way to white sands, blue seas and one of the world’s most spectacular coral reefs. But, in a story that will be familiar to observers of land rights worldwide, that beauty has brought developers eager to build, and conflict around the ownership of land occupied and claimed by longstanding Garifuna communities.

women farm africa
8 August 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Amani Mhinda
Tanzania
Global

Sextortion: referring to a form of blackmail in which sexual information or images are used to extort sexual favors from the victim. One of the biggest challenges for those working in the land and natural resources sector, has been drawing attention to the fact that this happens in our sector, too and most importantly, that something needs to be done about it. 

“A woman has long hair but a short brain”
9 July 2018
Authors: 
Lkhamdulam Natsagdorj
Mongolia

Reflections on an old Mongolian saying

 

At a recent gender training session in Mongolia, a middle-aged man used the old Mongolian saying that “a woman has long hair and a short brain” when we asked participants to name some of the main characteristics of women and men. I was glad that he was corrected by a much older man, who pointed out that the saying relates to traditional gender roles that are already very different from what they were just a few years ago.

We cannot wait indefinitely – interim options for land reform
18 June 2018
Authors: 
Sobantu Mzwakali
South Africa

The failure to secure the property rights of rural communities shows a clear policy gap between citizens and rights to land as per the Constitution and the attitude and practices of the state, traditional leaders, white farmers and mining companies in relation to such rights. 

Photo by: Moustafa Cheaiteli
17 April 2018
Authors: 
Dr. Catherine Picard
Dr. Mark Freudenberger
Central African Republic
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Western Africa
Ivory Coast

The artisanal mining sector in West and Central Africa is a rapidly expanding economic force employing millions of young people, often those who are the most vulnerable. Numerous ancillary informal economies are associated with the export of what are commonly known as “conflict minerals” such as diamonds, gold and coltan. Women grow crops and process food for the labor force of young men digging deep into the ground to pull out the ore and precious metals and stones.

Barbuda one month after Hurricane IrmaX. A home is seen in ruins in Codrington on the island of Barbuda
2 January 2018
Authors: 
Luis Triveno
Mr. Tim Hanstad
Global

The recent series of devastating hurricanes in the Caribbean has reminded the world, once again, that natural disasters are not equal-opportunity destroyers. The economically marginalized and those lacking secure land and property rights are often disproportionately affected for at least three reasons:

Asia
Myanmar
Taiwan
Vietnam

By Roy Prosterman

Asia’s Tigers, the collection of booming economies that emerged in the East following World War II, are often hailed as economic miracles. There was, though, no “secret sauce” behind that sustained and broad-based economic growth. Rather, as Myanmar is poised to show, the key ingredient for a Tiger economy can be found right beneath our feet.

Blogs

Events

Organizations

AZMEC is the Association of Zambian Mineral Exploration Companies.

The aims and objectives of AZMEC are to provide a discussion forum and dedicated lobby group for mineral exploration companies and mining companies carrying out exploration as well as government representatives, NGO’s, service providers, academic institutions and other interested parties in Zambia with the view to contributing to the growth, promotion, and sustainable development of the sector in this country.

ICMM is an international organisation dedicated to a safe, fair and sustainable mining and metals industry. Bringing together 26 mining and metals companies and 35 regional and commodities associations we strengthen environmental and social performance. We serve as a catalyst for change; enhancing mining’s contribution to society.

The mission of International Women and Mining Network - RIMM is to make visible the serious problems of women in mining across countries, governments, NGO’s, human rights groups, trade unions, mining struggle groups and communities and others concerned with the exploitation of women in mining and to stand as a strong global platform to fight for women’s rights and gender justice vis-a-vis mining.

IPIECA develops, shares and promotes good practice and knowledge to help the industry and improve its environmental and social performance. We do this with the understanding that the issues that dominate the sustainable development agenda – climate and energy, environmental and social issues – are too big for individual companies to tackle alone. The industry must work together to achieve improvements that have real impact. IPIECA helps to achieve this goal. 

KDNG is a network of Kachin civil society groups and development organizations inside Kachin State and abroad. It was in September 2004.

KDNG promotes the formation of a healthy civil society based on equality and justice for local people. It works to document the military government's exploitation of natural resources, collecting information large scale development including mining, mono crop plantation and hydropower.

London Mining Network (LMN) is an alliance of human rights, development, environmental and solidarity groups.

We work for

  • human rights, including the rights of Indigenous Peoples and workers, and
  • sustainable development (development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs in communities around the world affected by the activities of mining companies based in or funded from London

We do this by

POINT (Promotion of Indigenous and Nature Together) was established in March 2012. It is started as a response to the lack of organization led by “Indigenous Peoples” working for Indigenous Peoples’ issues in Myanmar. In the past, only the religious organizations are the strong civil society working for its related indigenous people’s needs of humanitarian and development assistance to some extent. Therefore, the organization POINT was formed in order to fill the gap of promoting the rights of indigenous peoples along with increased awareness on environmental related knowledge.

We operate with pioneering spirit

Our long history is filled with firsts. We have developed some of the world’s largest and best quality mines and operations, and our people work in around 35 countries across six continents. We’ve led the industry in partnerships, with customers in new markets, and with local communities. We’ve pioneered technological innovations, such as our Mine of the Future™ programme and our low-CO2 aluminium from hydropower. And we’ve paved the way in areas such as safety, tax transparency and legacy management.

SNC Lavalin International logo

Founded in 1911, SNC-Lavalin is a global fully integrated professional services and project management company and a major player in the ownership of infrastructure. From offices around the world, SNC-Lavalin's employees are proud to build what matters.

United States House Committee on Natural Resources  logo

The House Committee on Natural Resources, chaired by Rob Bishop of Utah, considers legislation about American energy production, mineral lands and mining, fisheries and wildlife, public lands, oceans, Native Americans, irrigation and reclamation. The Committee is comprised of 44 Representatives, 26 Republicans and 18 Democrats. Learn more about Chairman Bishop and meet all of the Committee Members.

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