Land Code (Amendment) Order, 2016 . | Land Portal

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Date of publication: 
June 2016
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ISBN / Resource ID: 
LEX-FAOC162815
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The Land Code is amended by inserting new sections dealing with many aspects related to land tenure, such as: concepts related to Land Code; Land Commissions and officer in charge of the Land Office administrative and legal proceedings; Land purchasing requirements (owned by purchaser as nominee on behalf of another person); prescribed fees presented to the Land Officer; a Land Officer's caveat shall continue in force until it is cancelled by the Land Officer: (a) of his own motion; or (b) on an application in that behalf by the registered owner of the land or any other person having a registered interest in the land or estate affected by the caveat; or (c) pursuant to any order of the Minister made on an appeal under subsection (5); where the Land Officer effects a cancellation under subsection (3), the Land Officer shall cancel the entry thereof in the Register and the extract of title and notify the registered owner of the land or any other person having a registered interest in the land affected by the caveat, etc.

Amends: Land Code (Chapter 40). (1983)

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The Sultanate of Brunei's influence peaked between the 15th and 17th centuries when its control extended over coastal areas of northwest Borneo and the southern Philippines. Brunei subsequently entered a period of decline brought on by internal strife over royal succession, colonial expansion of European powers, and piracy. In 1888, Brunei became a British protectorate; independence was achieved in 1984. The same family has ruled Brunei for over six centuries. Brunei benefits from extensive petroleum and natural gas fields, the source of one of the highest per capita GDPs in the world.

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