Emblem of Bangladesh
Governmental institution

Bangladesh Wikipedia page: "The Government of Bangladesh (Bengali: বাংলাদেশ সরকারBangladesh SôrkarGOB) is led by the Prime Minister, who selects all the remaining Ministers. The Prime Minister and the other most senior Ministers belong to the supreme decision-making committee, known as the Cabinet. The Government has three branches; the Executive branch, the Legislative branch and the Judicial branch."

Government of Bangladesh Resources

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10
Policy Papers & Briefs
October 2016
Bangladesh

The Government of Bangladesh has been taking concrete measures to address the problems relating to land administration and management. At the same time, however, the Government recognizes that more needs to be done at the policy level to tackle crucial systemic anomalies. As it stands now, the complexity and magnitude of issues pertaining to land administration and management in Bangladesh cannot be overstated. The nature and volume of land disputes in the nation call for practical measures directed at improving the land administration and management system.

Reports & Research
May 2016
Bangladesh

It has been frequently argued that women’s access to and control over land can potentially lead to greater gender equitability alongside addressing material deprivation. Gender equality today is considered one of the crucial premises for economic and social development as well as women’s empowerment as recognized in the MDGs and SDGs.

Legislation & Policies
July 1954
Bangladesh

The East Bengal State Acquisition and Tenancy Act of 1950 (also known as the East Pakistan Estate Acquisition Act 1950) was a law passed by the newly formed democratic Government of East Bengal in the Dominion of Pakistan (present day Bangladesh). The bill was drafted on 31 March 1948 during the early years of Pakistan and passed on 16 May 1951. Before passage of the legislature, landed revenue laws of Bengal consisted of the Permanent Settlement Regulations of 1793 and the Bengal Tenancy Act of 1885.

Legislation
December 1951
Bangladesh

An Act to provide for the acquisition by the State of the interests of rent-receivers and certain other interests in land in Bangladesh and to define the law relating to tenancies to be held under the State after such acquisition and other matters connected therewith.

It is notable that after independence from the British Colony in 1947, the government of Pakistan enacted the laws in line with the demand of Bangladesh peoples. As a result the regime of land lord has been destroyed by this act in Pakistan.  

Legislation & Policies
Legislation
May 1950
Bangladesh

     An Act to provide for the acquisition for public purposes of waste land in Bangladesh

Legislation
July 1943
Bangladesh

Two separate compilations, “Training Material on West Bengal Financial Rules and Office Procedure” & “Training Material on West Bengal Service Rules” were published. These proved to be extremely useful and generated widespread demand for more copies. This document to put together rules, procedures, practices and executive orders laid down and released from time to time by the Government for running offices at the districts. It will be published shortly as another Monograph under the title, “Collectorate Manual”.

Legislation
October 1875
Bangladesh
Asia
Southern Asia

The aim of this Act, consisting of 6 Parts, is to define and identificate the following land characteristics, specifying: the determination of the extent of erosion along the banks of rivers or the extent of accretion, reformation or new formation due to fluvial action of any river, the better security of landed property and the prevention of encroachments and disputes, to provide for the survey of lands and for the establishment and maintenance of marks to distinguish land boundaries.

Legislation
December 1825
Bangladesh

In consequence of the frequent changes which take place in the channel of the principal  rivers that intersect the Provinces immediately subject to the Presidency of Fort Willima, and the Shifting of the sands which lie in the beds of those rivers, chars or small islands are often thrown up by alluvion in the midst of the stream or near one of the banks, and large portions of land are carried away by an encroachment of the river on one side, whilst accessions of land are at the same time, or in subse quent years, gained by dereliction of the water on the opposite side; similar instances of

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