Natural Resource Perspectives (ODI) | Page 3 | Land Portal

ODI Natural Resource Perspectives present accessible information on current development issues and are sent to a wide audience of policy makers, researchers and people working in the non-governmental sector. The series ran from 1994 to 2008.


John Farrington, Editor of the NRP series, writes "Unfortunately, Sida support to the series has come to an end, and though they are happy with the series, their funding priorities have changed and enquiries have established that the series can no longer be included in their portfolio.


It has been a privilege, and a very enjoyable one, to edit the series since it began some 14 years ago, and we hope the existing NRPs will continue to be a valuable resource to you."

Natural Resource Perspectives (ODI) Resources

Displaying 11 - 15 of 18
Library Resource
January, 1999
Europe

Communities of present-day or former hunter-gatherers live in scattered communities across the world, although their precise numbers and status are very uncertain. Their often marginalised status and ethnolinguistic diversity has made it hard to articulate their case for land rights outside Australia and North America. Their preferred subsistence strategy, hunting, is often in direct conflict with conservation philosophies and protected areas often fall within their traditional hunting areas.

Library Resource
January, 1999
Mali, Sub-Saharan Africa

Wildlife consumption is an integral part of the livelihood and trade patterns of many peoples in the developing world, and highly valued by them. Yet to date the dominant models of wildlife management in areas of high – and allegedly unsustainable – consumptive use have favoured the exclusion of the users from the resource and the denial of its local values. This gives little incentive to rural dwellers to manage wildlife sustainably.

Library Resource
January, 1999
Sub-Saharan Africa

The present century has seen a significant real increase in resource conflict in semi-arid Africa. The most important causes of this are human population increase and the globalisation of the economy. Such conflicts reflect both point resources (mines, farms, reserves) and ecozonal conflicts (water, grazing and hunting rights). Although attempts to involve the community have been partially successful in relation to reserved land, conflict over extensive and patchy common property resources such as wetlands and grazing has made them more difficult to conserve and manage.

Library Resource
January, 1999

Following initial enthusiasm in the post-war period, land reform fell out of favour with donors from the early 1970s. Nonetheless, sporadic efforts to redistribute land continued: Ethiopia in 1975, Zimbabwe in 1980 and a renewed commitment to land reform in the Philippines in 1988. These reforms stemmed from shifts in the domestic balance of power between landowners and landless workers and peasants, which were quite independent of donor policies.

Library Resource
January, 1999

The move towards decentralisation of resource control and management promises more efficient, equitable and sustainable resource use. Debate centres on what type of institutional arrangement in a given context is most appropriate and will lead to the fulfilment of the above ideal. Aspects of these arrangements include property rights structures as well as organisational structures.

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