Acronym: 
TI
Intergovernmental or Multilateral organization

About

One global movement sharing one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.

In 1993, a few individuals decided to take a stance against corruption and created Transparency International. Now present in more than 100 countries, the movement works relentlessly to stir the world’s collective conscience and bring about change. Much remains to be done to stop corruption, but much has also been achieved, including:

  • the creation of international anti-corruption conventions
  • the prosecution of corrupt leaders and seizures of their illicitly gained riches
  • national elections won and lost on tackling corruption
  • companies held accountable for their behaviour both at home and abroad

OUR MISSION

Our Mission is to stop corruption and promote transparency, accountability and integrity at all levels and across all sectors of society. Our Core Values are: transparency, accountability, integrity, solidarity, courage, justice and democracy.

OUR VISION

Our Vision is a world in which government, politics, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.

OUR VALUES

  • Transparency
  • Accountability
  • Integrity
  • Solidarity
  • Courage
  • Justice
  • Democracy
Members: 

Transparency International Resources

Displaying 1 - 10 of 22
Reports & Research
September 2018
Global

Transparency International’s experience shows clear links between the issues of land governance, women’s rights, corruption and the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These links are especially prevalent in lower-income countries, where people’s reliance on their land is greatest, and land governance and women’s rights are often weak – as highlighted in our 2018 resource book Women, Land and Corruption

Reports & Research
July 2018
Sierra Leone
Scotland

In many countries, unidentified private individuals and legal entities obtain significant economic benefits from land. This lack of transparency can make it harder for affected communities and governments to hold them accountable for land use decision-making and any sort of violation they commit. It can also leave investors open to risk if they do not know who is truly behind a company they are doing business with. 

Reports & Research
March 2018
Africa

Despite increasing attention in recent years, little evidence has been available on the issue of women, land and corruption in Africa to inform effective policy-making. There has been no compilation of relevant background information, lessons learnt and approaches to tackling land corruption as it affects women. This publication aims to address that gap, providing practitioners and decision-makers with a compendium of research findings, contextual information and practical solutions to help fulfil women’s land rights.

Reports & Research
March 2018
Africa

Women, Land and Corruption is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa — and its disproportionate effect on women

Investigating Land Corruption in Africa (cover)
Manuals & Guidelines
March 2018
Africa

Every second citizen in Africa has been affected by land corruption in recent years, according to research from Transparency International. For communities, the effects of land corruption include insecure tenure, food insecurity, barriers to socio-economic development, increased risk of conflict, and a threat to traditional ways of life.

Manuals & Guidelines
January 2017
Sub-Saharan Africa

Land corruption affects women and men, but the impact is experienced differently by each gender. Packed with practical advice, this guide, produced by Transparency International, will help organisations understand these differences in order to design advocacy programmes that are both inclusive and effective.

Women and Land in Africa cover image
Reports & Research
May 2016
Zimbabwe
Ghana
Journal Articles & Books
March 2016
Global

In Tanzania, several women employees at a court began to fall ill one after the other. What would normally be overlooked as an innocuous seasonal virus proved to be fatal – the women had been infected with HIV. It was eventually discovered that the court clerk who supervised the women had forced them to sleep with him if they wanted to receive their pay for working overtime. He was HIV positive.

Policy Papers & Briefs
March 2016
Africa
Ghana
Zimbabwe
This paper, presented at the 2016 World Bank Conference on Land and Poverty, explores the intersection between land corruption and women's access and ownership of land. Through analyzing a series of case studies, the paper notes that land access and ownership is increasingly defined by
variables such as power, patronage and politics.

Share this page