pastoral land rights related Blog post | Land Portal
There are 275 content items of different types and languages related to pastoral land rights on the Land Portal.

pastoral land rights

pastoral land rights refer to the right to use specific pastoral land.

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Долоон жилийн төсөл эхэлж байхад
16 August 2023
Authors: 
Narangerel Yansanjav
Asia
Central Asia
Mongolia
Global

Хүн Төвтэй Байгаль Хамгаалал байгууллагын үйл ажиллагааны нэг чиглэл нь  малчдын, ялангуяа уул уурхайн нөлөөнд өртсөн малчин өрхийн жендэрийн асуудал юм.  Тиймээс ч бид 7 жилийн өмнө Эмэгтэйчүүдийн газар эдэлбэрийн эрхийн баталгаат байдал (ЭГЭЭББ) олон улсын төсөл д нэгдэн орсон. 

Wasaidizi wa jinsia na ardhi wanaweza kusaidia
16 August 2023
Authors: 
Joyce Ndakaru
Africa
Eastern Africa
Tanzania
Global

Jamii nyingi za vijijini nchini Tanzania zina changamoto zinazofanana  kutokana na makampuni ya uchimbaji madini na wawekezaji. Nimejionea jinsi wanaume na wanawake ambao ni wasaidizi wa jinsia na ardhi wanavyoweza kusaidia.

Confident Gender and Land Champions
11 July 2023
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
Africa
Tanzania
Asia
Mongolia
Global

Rather than scaling up, I think we should be talking about scaling out and scaling over time when it comes to inclusive, community-led land governance.

WOLTS gender and land champions in Tanzania
27 April 2023
Authors: 
Joyce Ndakaru
Africa
Eastern Africa
Tanzania
Global

Many rural communities in Tanzania share similar challenges from mining companies and investors. I have seen first-hand how men and women gender and land champions can help.

Pastoralists in Kenya, 2021
20 April 2023
Authors: 
Dr. Rick de Satgé
Sub-Saharan Africa

This What to Read digest examines livestock keeping in pastoral systems and features recent research that reviews the relationship between pastoral livelihoods and global climate change.

WOLTS Mongolia
19 April 2023
Authors: 
Narangerel Yansanjav
Asia
Central Asia
Mongolia
Global

PCC joined the global WOLTS project seven years ago, as we were interested in its focus on gender and herding communities, especially those affected by mining, but we had no idea what a learning journey it would be! 

10 January 2023
Somalia

Mark Duffield and Nicholas Stockton write how the ecologically sustainable, communally managed subsistence pastoralism in Somalia has been displaced by militarised extractive ranching. Challenging mainstream accounts of the “drought” Duffield and Stockton argue the current crisis is the result of decades of bad development and relief interventions that have promoted impoverishment and hunger.

Ethiopian pastoralists
29 March 2022
Authors: 
Dr. Daniel Behailu
Nathaniah Jacobs
Ethiopia

In Ethiopia, pastoralist communities and other communal land users face significant threats due to government policies which favour large-scale land investments and erode communal land rights. Here, Daniel Behailu and Nathaniah Jacobs discuss the importance of developing laws that recognise and respect communal land rights in Ethiopia, potential legal solutions, and why change will require community engagement and social legitimacy to work.

16 July 2021
Authors: 
Dr. Agnes M. Kalibata
Dr. Michael Taylor
Global

Our food systems are in urgent need of transformation, as humanity faces one of our biggest challenges yet; feeding a future population of 10 billion people with safe and nutritious food while keeping a healthy planet. Our food system has the power to tip the scales and transform the future of our planet and humankind.

11 September 2020
Authors: 
Michael Brown
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Global

The global conservation community now faces the added challenge of Covid-19 on top of a longstanding set of complex conservation, sustainability, and development challenges. In the wake of this pandemic, return to business as usual is not a viable option. The existing systems and structures upon which conservation is based must evolve. Climate change, biodiversity conservation, and poverty elimination efforts have been further complicated by Covid-19, with the brunt of the pandemic borne most acutely by the poorest and most vulnerable.

1 September 2020
Authors: 
Ms. B. Munkhtuvshin
Mongolia

In central Mongolia, the summer is warm and soft rain falls on the steppes. For herders like Baasandorj, it is a busy time of year, filled with combing sheep’s wool, milking cows and making dairy products for the winter. 

Young champions – hope for Mongolia’s herding traditions
27 July 2020
Authors: 
Ms. Suvd Boldbaatar
Mongolia

“It's hard to find the right life partner in my soum (district). Most of the girls went to school, then to university in the city. Not many of them are good at herding.” 

Like most young women who grew up in the city, I usually think of herders as quiet men with closed faces that are wrinkled and burnt by the sun. Khuukhenduu Naranbold is quite the opposite. He is smooth-skinned with an open face and a big smile. Even though he is only 23 years old, he is self-confident and keen to talk.  

Khuukhenduu’s comments about marriage and herding were recorded in 2016 at the beginning of a five-year action research project on women’s land tenure security, called WOLTS. The project has focused on pastoralist communities affected by mining, and has involved repeated visits and evidence gathering in several communities in Mongolia and Tanzania. I have been a part of the WOLTS team since June 2016.

Khuukhenduu comes from Dalanjargalan in the Gobi Desert – an area of Mongolia where the traditional herding lifestyle is under threat, not only from mining but also because many young herder men are struggling to marry. This is because boys, especially in herding families, are expected to look after the family’s animals, while girls are more likely to finish school and go to university. Once the girls leave to study in the city, few want to return to the harsh herding lifestyle.

Although it is difficult to find a partner, Khuukhenduu is not unhappy. He is a keen horseman and very proud of his riding skills. He is a member of the Mongolian Federation of Horse Racing and Trainers, and he loves racing. Unlike most other herders, who have adopted Chinese motorcycles and modern clothes, he still herds his animals on horseback and often wears a beautiful red deel (traditional costume). 

However the nomadic herding life is difficult, and, although he lives in his own ger (traditional felted tent), Khuukhenduu stays close to his parents so that taking care of animals can be shared. At the same time, he uses social media to keep in touch with his school friends – and with girls.

This contrast between tradition and modern technology illustrates the tensions and rapid changes taking place in today’s herding lifestyle. Khuukhenduu has profound knowledge of nature and how to successfully make a living from the land. He also embraces the internet, and was an eager participant in our WOLTS training programme this year on gender, land rights and the law.

In his small community in Dalanjargalan, Khuukhenduu is already well known. Although he does not have high academic qualifications, he is a skilled manager who knows how to maintain pastureland and raise quality livestock. He is also a confident speaker and a natural leader, so it is not surprising that older participants in the WOLTS programme selected him to become a community champion on gender and land. In some ways in his everyday life he is just like a CEO – taking responsibility, always having to think about the future and plan for both the good times and the bad, while constantly carrying out a whole range of highly skilled herding activities.  

Mongolian masculinity is celebrated in July every year in the Naadam festival of the three ‘manly sports’ of horse riding, wrestling and archery. Khuukhenduu is a participant and fierce competitor in Naadam games – especially horse racing. But his skills, grounded in the country’s herding traditions, will be lost unless the country and the government support nomadic families to thrive. 

I often worry that our country does not put sufficient value on the traditional knowledge and skills of herding people. If the herders go, Mongolia will lose centuries of experience in sustainable land and animal management. If Khuukhenduu struggles to marry and raise a family, what hope is there for other young herders? 

The herding life is not for everyone, but I know that city life also has its problems. I also realise that knowledge often comes from life’s experiences, not only from books and university. As Mongolia looks for ways to develop new industries we need to remember our proud nomadic heritage and make sure we protect herders’ land rights, not only to support tourism but – most importantly – as the foundation for so many Mongolian families’ lives. As trained and respected community champions, thoughtful young leaders like Khuukhenduu are the very people who offer us hope for the future.

 

 

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Maliasili Initiatives is a non-profit organization that supports the growth, development and performance of leading civil society organizations working to advance sustainable natural resource management practices in Africa.

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Mission & Vision: 


To promote the livelihoods of Indigenous pastoralists through preservation of their cultural values, utilization of locally available resources and informed participation with consent for their development. To have Indigenous pastoralist community attain sustainable development and have its culture recognized, respected and preserved

The Regional Learning and Advocacy Programme or REGLAP (which was known previously as the Regional Pastoral Livelihoods Advocacy Project) is funded by ECHO (European Commission Humanitarian Office) and aims to reduce the vulnerability of pastoral communities through policy and practice change in the Horn and East Africa.


REGLAP also seeks to promote the integration of humanitarian assistance with development interventions through disaster risk reduction (DRR) among governments, donors and national and international CSOs (civil society organisations).

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We are a development charity that works with herders and farmers in Africa's drylands (the Sahel region).

HEKS EPER

Swiss Church Aid (HEKS/EPER )

HEKS champions the cause of a more humane and just world and a life in dignity. Internationally, HEKS/EPER focuses on rural community development, humanitarian aid and inter-church cooperation. 

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