Indigenous & Community Land Rights related Blog post | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
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25 March 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Laura Tuck
Mr. Wael Zakout
Global

This week, more than 1,500 development professionals from around the world are gathering at the World Bank’s annual Land and Poverty Conference, discussing the latest research and innovations in policies and good practice on land governance. 

ILDC 2019
9 March 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Pranab Choudhury
India

Conservation, said Aldo Leopold, is harmony between (wo)men and land. Land should justifiably figure not only into the conservation, but also in development debates, policy and discourses. Missing land rights and land tenure security can be costly for states, communities as well as local and global development.

Harvesting sago along the Tuba River in Maluku province, Indonesia. Photo by Ulet Ifansasti/CIFOR.
25 January 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Peter Veit
Marlena Chertock
Katelyn Bredsnajder
Peru

Peruvian indigenous communities have shown themselves to be exceptional environmental and conservation leaders. Their leaders have worked for a decade to ensure a government commitment to conserve 54 million hectares of forest, as a part of the REDD+ program.

Land Matters: How Securing Community Land Rights Can Slow Climate Change and Accelerate the Sustainable Development Goals
25 January 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Peter Veit
Bolivia
Brazil
Colombia
Global

There is a strong and compelling environment and development case to be made for securing indigenous and community lands. Securing collective land rights offers a low-cost, high-reward investment for developing country governments and their partners to meet national development objectives and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Securing community lands is also a cost-effective climate mitigation measure for countries when compared to other carbon capture and storage approaches.

15 January 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Pranab Choudhury
India

Of late, land has increasingly been figuring into the development sector, for both positive and negative reasons.

14 December 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Yator Kiptum
Kenya

The Sengwer are an indigenous hunter-gatherer people living along the slopes of the Cherangany Hills in the western highlands of Kenya. Their estimated population is 33,187.

13 December 2018
Authors: 
Mr. Juan Pablo Sarmiento Barletti
Global

We cannot restore tropical forests without restoring the rights of their traditional owners.

Implementing a coordinated global response to curb demand for energy and eliminate further deforestation would reduce the need to deploy artificial carbon dioxide removal technologies, according to a decisive report from the U.N. scientific panel on climate change.

12 December 2018
Authors: 
Ms. Loh Foon Fong
Malaysia

WATER. The most basic necessity that most people take for granted because it is readily available by just a turn of the tap.

But for some groups in Malaysia, safe drinking water and sanitation is not accessible.

The Shipibo-Conibo in their fishing grounds. CIFOR/Alex Talaverano)
4 December 2018
Authors: 
Julia Naime Sanchez-Henkel
Peru

Peru - A recent Rights and Resources report provides strong evidence on the importance of recognizing and protecting indigenous rights towards mitigating forest-based emissions and curbing global warming. As a Ph.D.

Women activists walk on top of reclaimed land during a protest against land reclamation in Jakarta Bay, Indonesia, in this April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Beawiharta/File
4 December 2018
Authors: 
Dr. Michael Taylor
Fred Nelson
Global

After decades of being the elephant in the room of global development, only now are we seeing increased recognition of land rights

Fred Nelson is executive director of Maliasili and Michael Taylor is director of International Land Coalition 

Land rights have finally been invited to the party - sitting at the intersection of some of the world’s most urgent development, environmental, and human rights priorities.

Plant nursery in Yangambi, DRC. Photo by Axel Fassio/CIFOR
5 November 2018
Authors: 
Joseph Feyertag
Dr. Julian Quan
Global

Commercial agriculture has driven land use changes and not only affected millions of hectares of forested land, but also farmers’ and local people’s land rights. Efforts to combat deforestation are at the forefront of the international aid agenda, and clarifying and securing land rights is important for its success.

2 November 2018
Africa

African governments should recognise customary rights to water for millions of small farmers who have been sidelined or "criminalised" by permit systems created during the colonial era, said a report published on Monday.

Restrictive permit systems in Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe have left more than 100 million people without access to enough water, according to the report by the Sri Lanka-based International Water Management Institute (IWMI).

Those countries should "decolonise statutory water law through a hybrid approach", according to the report.

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