| Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
Displaying 111 - 120 of 1210
Institutional & promotional materials
October 2017
Ethiopia
Kenya
Mali
Niger
Tanzania
Western Africa
Eastern Africa

The document presents the progress of three interrelated components: 1) MEL-platform for supporting project planning and implementation of review and monitoring strategy; 2) Framework for Project engagement with Development Partners, measuring project outcomes and impacts where possible; 3)
Geoinformatics Options by Context (GeOC)

Responsible Investments in Land Perspectives from Tanzania and Globally
Reports & Research
September 2017
Global
Tanzania

Landesa (strengthening land rights for the world’s poorest people) and Land Portal co‑facilitated the online dialogue on “Responsible investments in land: perspective from Tanzania and globally” from June 5 -16, 2017.

For details on the dialogue follow this link.

Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2017
Tanzania
Africa

This paper investigates the presence of endogenous peer effects in the adoption of formal property rights. Using data from a unique land titling experiment held in an unplanned settlement in Dar es Salaam, the analysis finds a strong, positive impact of neighbor adoption on the household's choice to purchase a land title.

Journal Articles & Books
August 2017
Tanzania

Full Citation: Dancer, Helen (2017) An equal right to inherit? Women's land rights, customary law and constitutional reform in Tanzania. Social and Legal Studies, 26 (3). pp. 291-310. ISSN 1461-7390

Conference Papers & Reports
July 2017
Tanzania
Africa
Eastern Africa
Southern Africa

In pastoral societies women face many challenges. Some describe these as a ‘double burden’ –
that is, as pastoralists and as women. However, pastoral women may obtain a significant degree
of protection from customary law even if customary institutions are male-dominated. In periods

Journal Articles & Books
July 2017
Tanzania
Africa
Eastern Africa
Southern Africa

Low adoption of sustainable intensification technologies hinders achievement of their potential impacts on increasing agricultural productivity. Proper targeting of locations to scale-out particular technologies is a key determinant of the rate of adoption. Targeting locations with similar biophysical and socio-economic characteristics significantly increases the probability of adoption.

Cover photo
Policy Papers & Briefs
May 2017
Tanzania

In this communiqué, the undersigned Non-State Actors (civil society, pastoralist, research, private, farmers’ unions and other stakeholders) champion a call to action and outline recommendations on livestock policy advocacy strategies that take into consideration the unique conditions and opportunities of the livestock sector development in Tanzania

Can Tanzania feed itself by 2050?: Estimating cereal self-sufficiency to 2050 cover image
Reports & Research
May 2017
Tanzania

Producing adequate food to meet global demand by 2050 is widely recognized as a major challenge, particularly for Africa south of the Sahara, including Tanzania (Godfray et al. 2010; Alexandratos and Bruinsma 2012; van Ittersum et al. 2016). Increased price volatility of major food crops (Koning et al. 2008; Lagi et al.

Share this page