Towards Transparency in Land Ownership: A Desk Review of Laws, Policies and Secondary Sources | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
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Date of publication: 
July 2018
Resource Language: 
Pages: 
35

This report analyses the land registration system and applicable legal framework in Sierra Leone to determine whether these ensure adequate transparency and accountability, particularly in the context of beneficial ownership. The research for this report was conducted as part of the process of testing a new research framework to assess beneficial land ownership, as discussed in Towards Transparency in Land Ownership: A Framework for Research on Beneficial Land Ownership (Transparency International: 2018). 

Based on the findings from the analysis, the report includes a set of evidence-based recommendations for reforming land laws and relevant land governance practices to ensure public disclosure of beneficial ownership interests in land and resources, as well as dissemination of crucial information needed to hold investors and other actors accountable for decisions that impact the environment, human rights and food security.

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One global movement sharing one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.

In 1993, a few individuals decided to take a stance against corruption and created Transparency International. Now present in more than 100 countries, the movement works relentlessly to stir the world’s collective conscience and bring about change. Much remains to be done to stop corruption, but much has also been achieved, including:

Publisher(s): 

About

One global movement sharing one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.

In 1993, a few individuals decided to take a stance against corruption and created Transparency International. Now present in more than 100 countries, the movement works relentlessly to stir the world’s collective conscience and bring about change. Much remains to be done to stop corruption, but much has also been achieved, including:

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