Nine years after war's end, Sri Lankans wait for government to return property | Land Portal
Author(s): 
Rina Chandran
Language of the news reported: 
English

"Despite repeated pledges by the authorities, the military has been frustratingly slow to restore land to the rightful owners"

BANGKOK - Sri Lanka has failed to fulfil pledges to return properties to thousands of people forced from their homes during decades of war, many of whom now live in desperate poverty, researchers said on Tuesday.

Thousands of acres of land taken over during the war are still held by government forces who set up security posts and buffer zones, according to a report by Human Rights Watch.

State agencies such as the wildlife department hold properties as well, it said.

"All those displaced during Sri Lanka's brutal civil war are entitled to return to their homes," said Meenakshi Ganguly, South Asia director at Human Rights Watch.

"Despite repeated pledges by the authorities, the military has been frustratingly slow to restore land to the rightful owners," Ganguly said in a statement.

Countries dealing with conflict and its aftermath often face challenges returning property to those forced from their land, cause by a loss of records, overlapping claims, and a lack of necessary institutional and regulatory frameworks.

In Sri Lanka, most of those who fled their homes during the war were Tamils, an ethnic and religious Hindu minority in the largely-Buddhist country.

Hundreds of thousands of Tamils were displaced several times over during the conflict, Ganguly said.

More than 10,000 people remain in camps, and many others are still "effectively displaced", living with other communities or close to areas where they fled from, she said.

The government has said it has returned between 80 percent and 85 percent of the confiscated land to original owners.

But while authorities have taken steps to return land to the original owners, the process has been hindered by a lack of transparency and claims about national security, Ganguly said.

President Maithripala Sirisena last week said he had ordered the release of all civilian lands held by the state in the northern and eastern provinces by December 31.

But the government must also draw up a resettlement policy to ensure adequate reparations and infrastructure on the land, including shelters, access to water, healthcare, education and public transport, said Ruki Fernando, a human rights activist.

"It is crucial to ensure that the lands are in fit condition for people to live in dignity," said Fernando, an adviser to INFORM, a human rights documentation centre in Colombo.

"Merely relocating people or providing financial compensation is not enough," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

 

Photo credit: REUTERS/Dinuka Liyanawatte

Copyright © Source (mentioned above). All rights reserved. The Land Portal distributes materials without the copyright owner’s permission based on the “fair use” doctrine of copyright, meaning that we post news articles for non-commercial, informative purposes. If you are the owner of the article or report and would like it to be removed, please contact us at hello@landportal.info and we will remove the posting immediately.

Various news items related to land governance are posted on the Land Portal every day by the Land Portal users, from various sources, such as news organizations and other institutions and individuals, representing a diversity of positions on every topic. The copyright lies with the source of the article; the Land Portal Foundation does not have the legal right to edit or correct the article, nor does the Foundation endorse its content. To make corrections or ask for permission to republish or other authorized use of this material, please contact the copyright holder.

Share this page