AgEcon Search
University or Research Institution

AgEcon Search: Research in Agricultural and Applied Economics collects, indexes, and electronically distributes full text copies of scholarly research in the broadly defined field of agricultural economics including sub disciplines such as agribusiness, food supply, natural resource economics, environmental economics, policy issues, agricultural trade, and economic development.

The majority of items in AgEcon Search are working papers, conference papers, and journal articles, although other types such as books chapters and government documents are included. AgEcon Search will serve as the permanent archive for this literature and encourages authors and organizations to use this electronic library as the storehouse for additional appropriate scholarly electronic works.

AgEcon Search is co-sponsored by the Department of Applied Economics and the University Libraries at University of Minnesota and the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

The site has received encouragement and financial support from:

Agricultural Economics Reference Organization
Agricultural and Applied Economics Association
European Association of Agricultural Economists
Farm Foundation
International Association of Agricultural Economists
USDA Economic Research Service

AgEcon Search is part of the University of Minnesota's Digital Conservancy, which provides stewardship, reliable long-term access, and broad dissemination of the digital scholarly and administrative works of the University of Minnesota faculty, departments, centers and offices.

Papers and articles downloaded from AgEcon Search may be used for non-commercial purposes and personal study only. No other use, including posting to another Internet site, is permitted without permission from the copyright owner, or as allowed under the provisions of Fair Use, U.S. Copyright Act, Title 17 U.S.C.

AgEcon Search does not hold the copyright to articles, working papers, conference papers, or other materials available in the database. Copyrights may be held by any of the following: individual authors, multiple authors, organizations, institutions, or publishers.

History

AgEcon Search began in 1995 as an experiment to see if it were possible to use the internet to archive, index and deliver on demand, full text working papers produced by university agricultural economics departments. The first papers were from agricultural economics departments at Minnesota and Wisconsin. These early papers predated the World Wide Web and were mounted on a GOPHER server in WordPerfect format. The project was (and still is) a cooperative project of the University of Minnesota Libraries, the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota and the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association (AAEA). The Farm Foundation and the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture provided financial support in the beginning of the project. Patricia Rodkewich and Louise Letnes managed AgEcon Search until Patricia's retirement in 2001, when Julie Kelly joined the AgEcon Search team. Erik Biever also served on the original AgEcon Search team, providing valued technical services and guidance. The members of the Agricultural Economics Reference Organization endorsed the efforts of AgEcon Search early on and have been instrumental in expanding the use of AgEcon Search in their respective institutions.

Since its inception AgEcon Search has operated as a distributed network, with each institution designating a member of their organization to submit papers on their behalf. With this model, costs for maintaining the system were kept low and institutions do not have to pay membership fees for participation. In the cases where an institution had no central person to act as the network member, a fee has been charged for AgEcon Search staff to submit papers. The first organization to choose this option was the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, which since 1997 has been contracting with AgEcon Search to post its annual conference papers.

AgEcon Search Resources

Displaying 11 - 20 of 311
Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007

In this paper we present a preliminary analysis of whether and how spatial variation in environmental attributes affects the residential sorting of households with heterogeneous preferences. An important implication of such sorting arises if variation in preferences over environmental attributes is correlated with household activities affecting the local ecosystem, such as the replacement of native vegetation with lawns, and the removal of course woody habitat from a lake.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007

Metropolitan Atlanta has experienced explosive population growth in the past few decades, which has resulted in rapid residential growth. The City of Roswell is one the best examples of residential growth on the urban fringe of Atlanta, with its housing stock increasing by more than 50 percent from 1990 to 2000. Stormwater runoff created from these development sites is expected to be causing sedimentation accumulation in lakes within Roswell and a neighboring, downstream wildlife refuge located in the City of Mountain Park.

Reports & Research
December 2007

This report summarizes the 2007 results of the North Dakota Land Valuation Model. The model is used annually to estimate average land values by county, based on the value of production from cropland and non-cropland. The county land values developed from this procedure form the basis for the 2007 valuation of agricultural land for real estate tax assessment. The average "all land value" from this analysis is multiplied by the total acres of agricultural land on the county abstract to determine each county's total agricultural land value for taxation purposes.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007
Hungary
Austria

In 2003 a research study looked at the position of smallholders; the survey was carried outusing questionnaires and interviews. The 613 farms included in the survey were situated in 3counties in the Southern Great Plain of Hungary and in 3 counties of the Western part of thecountry (Transdanubia). The results of the survey showed that there was a firm tendency ofconcentration among the Hungarian individual farms. Though their average size is about 3 ha,the number and area of farms over 50 ha size are rapidly growing and taking a significant partof the total individual agricultural area.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007
Australia

Dry land salinisation is a significant cause of land and water degradation in Australia.Changing land use from annual to perennial crops has been widely proposed as ameans to reduce land degradation and increase the productivity of saline land.However, in many areas annual crops are financially more attractive than perennialcrops. Increases in perennial crops might also reduce local stream flows with adverseeffects on in-stream values. As such salinity control is likely to involve significanttradeoffs between public and private costs and benefits.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007
Benin

The main question in this research is to what extent agriculture on fragile slopes would become more sustainable if the farmers were given more possibilities for selling their products and acquiring production resources. An empirical study conducted in northern Benin demonstrates that a more accessible market does not lead to substantial increase in soil erosion control measures.

Reports & Research
December 2007

Net farm income for nearly all representative farms in 2016 is projected to be higher than in 2006. Low-profit farms, which comprise 20% of the farms in the study, may not have financial resiliency to survive without off-farm income. Commodity prices and yields are projected to increase slightly faster than costs, which will increase net farm income. Cropland prices and cash rental rates are projected to increase slightly in all regions. Debt-to-asset ratios for all farms will decrease slightly throughout the forecast period.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007
Ethiopia

Although a large theoretical literature discusses the possible inefficiency of sharecropping contracts, empirical evidence on this phenomenon has been ambiguous at best. Household level fixed-effect estimates from about 8,500 plots operated by households who own and sharecrop land in the Ethiopian highlands provide support for the hypothesis of Marshallian inefficiency. At the same time, a factor adjustment model suggests that the extent to which rental markets allow households to attain their desired operational holding size is extremely limited.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007

The net present value (NPV) of downstream economic benefits of changes inwater-yield (W) and salt-load (S) of mean annual river flow received by a lowercatchment from an upper catchment are described as a 3-dimensional (NPV,W, S)surface, where dNPV/dW > 0 and dNPV/d(S/W) < 0. Upstream changes in land use (i.e.forest clearing or forest establishment, which result in higher or lower water-yields,respectively) are driven by economic consequences for land owners.

Conference Papers & Reports
December 2007

The importance of agriculture is decreasing all over the world. The aim of the paper is to compare the ownership structure and land use in some selected former Central and Eastern European countries. The property structure and land use is in dichotomy, the production is performed simultaneously on small-size farms which produce primarily for self-consumption. The importance of farm land leases is increasing.

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