United States Agency for International Development | Page 9 | Land Portal

About Us

We envision a world in which land governance systems, both formal and informal, are effective, accessible, and responsive for all. This is possible when land tenure and property rights are recognized as critical development issues and when the United States Government and its development partners demonstrate consistent attention and a firm commitment to supporting coordinated policies and programs that clarify and strengthen the land tenure and property rights of all members of society, enabling broad-based economic growth, gender equality, reduced incidence of conflicts, enhanced food security, improved resilience to climate change, and effective natural resource management.

Mission Statement

The USAID Land Tenure and Resource Management (LTRM) Office will lead the United States Government to realize international efforts—in accordance with the U.S. Government’s Land Governance Policy—to clarify and strengthen the land tenure and property rights of all members of society—individuals, groups and legal entities, including those individuals and groups that are often marginalized, and the LTRM Office will help ensure that land governance systems are effective, accessible, and responsive. We will achieve this by testing innovative models for securing land tenure and property rights and disseminating best practice as it relates to securing land rights and improving resource governance within the USG and our development partners.

United States Agency for International Development Resources

Displaying 81 - 90 of 407
Library Resource
Journal Articles & Books
March, 2014
Canada, Japan, Denmark, Sweden, United Kingdom, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands, Switzerland

USAID Land Tenure and Property Rights Division Chief Dr. Gregory Myers's Remarks from Partners’ Support to the Voluntary Guidelines & Land Governance: Exploiting Synergies & Measuring Impact. Remarks posted as written. Madam Chair (Rachael Turner), thank you for the opportunity to speak today. On behalf of the United States, I would like to thank the U.K. Department for International Development for their excellent leadership as the inaugural Chair of the Global Donor Working Group on Land.

Library Resource
Policy Papers & Briefs
March, 2014
Myanmar

A guest post by Robert Oberndorf, Resource Law Specialist, Tenure and Global Climate Change Project. Recent rapid changes in Burma have led to concerns related to the land tenure and property rights (LTPR) of smallholder farmers and communities throughout the country. The limited harmonization and dated nature of the overall legal and governance frameworks related to land use management and tenure security in the country adds to these concerns.

Library Resource
Policy Papers & Briefs
March, 2014
Africa

A guest post by Dr. Daniel Monchuk, Agricultural Economist, Cloudburst Group; Dr. Cynthia M. Caron, Assistant Professor of International Development and Social Change, Clark University; and Stephanie Fenner, IDCE Fellow, Clark University

Library Resource
February, 2014
Bangladesh, India, Pakistan

A guest post by Bholanath Chakladar, a District Project Manager for Landesa India in West Bengal. This post originally appeared on Landesa's Field Focus Blog.
Last week, 55,339 destitute families across West Bengal received legal title to a micro-plot of land. The state of West Bengal, in partnership with Landesa, has been on the forefront of addressing extreme rural poverty through providing poor, landless, rural families with a small plot of land where they can live and grow food. Thus far, West Bengal has provided more than 160,000 landless families with micro-plots.

Library Resource
January, 2014
Haiti, Philippines

By Dr. Gregory Myers, USAID Division Chief, Land Tenure and Property Rights.
Last week, I visited Haiti to assess the land tenure and property rights situation there—four years after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake killed between 100,000 and 300,000 people and displaced another 1.5 million. Many Haitians continue to live in extreme poverty and much needs to be done to address the weak property rights system that slows economic growth and hinders infrastructure rebuilding efforts.

Library Resource
January, 2014
Guinea

Côte d’Ivoire emerged from a decade-long civil war in early 2011, but its diamonds—which played a role in sustaining the conflict—have remained on the world’s black lists. In November 2013, however, the Kimberley Process (KP) Plenary in Johannesburg recognized that Cote d’Ivoire had met minimum requirements of the KP Certification Scheme, the international mechanism to prevent conflict diamonds from entering the world’s markets.

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