statute law | Land Portal
There are 56 content items related to statute law on the Land Portal.

Statutory law refers to the legislation (or other legal instruments also referred to as statutes) passed by a legislative body and formally placed on record in a written or printed form.

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Research: land use challenges for Indonesia's transition to renewable energy
2 July 2020
Indonesia

(MENAFN - The Conversation) The world's fourth-highest emitter of greenhouse gases , Indonesia, is heavily reliant on coal to generate electricity. Its coal-fired power plants produce a third of the country's emissions.

To minimise its future greenhouse gas emissions, Indonesia is gearing up to develop its vast renewable energy resources - including solar, wind, and geothermal.

TrustLaw: Free Legal Services for NGOs
12 September 2018
Global

TrustLaw is the Thomson Reuters Foundation’s global pro bono legal programme. We connect high-impact NGOs and social enterprises working to create social and environmental change with the best law firms and corporate legal teams to provide them with free legal assistance. We produce groundbreaking legal research and offer innovative training courses worldwide.

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The Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law

The Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law (Journal) is published three times annually by the students of the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona. The Journal publishes articles on a wide variety of international and comparative law topics in order to provide a forum for debate on current issues affecting international legal development including international and comparative law issues and tribal/indigenous peoples law.

Asian Journal of Comparative Law

The Asian Journal of Comparative Law (AsJCL) is the leading forum for research and discussion of the law and legal systems of Asia. It embraces work that is theoretical, empirical, socio-legal, doctrinal or comparative that relates to one or more Asian legal systems, as well as work that compares one or more Asian legal systems with non-Asian systems. The Journal seeks articles which display an intimate knowledge of Asian legal systems, and thus provide a window into the way they work in practice.

This is the profile for all governmental institutions of Kingdom of Eswatini (formerly known as Kingdom of Swaziland).

The site of several advanced Amerindian civilizations - including the Olmec, Toltec, Teotihuacan, Zapotec, Maya, and Aztec - Mexico was conquered and colonized by Spain in the early 16th century. Administered as the Viceroyalty of New Spain for three centuries, it achieved independence early in the 19th century. Elections held in 2000 marked the first time since the 1910 Mexican Revolution that an opposition candidate - Vicente FOX of the National Action Party (PAN) - defeated the party in government, the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI).

During the late 18th-early 19th centuries, the principality of Gorkha united many of the other principalities and states of the sub-Himalayan region into a Nepalese Kingdom. Nepal retained its independence following the Anglo-Nepalese War of 1814-16 and the subsequent peace treaty laid the foundations for two centuries of amicable relations between Britain and Nepal.

The Pacific coast of Nicaragua was settled as a Spanish colony from Panama in the early 16th century. Independence from Spain was declared in 1821 and the country became an independent republic in 1838. Britain occupied the Caribbean Coast in the first half of the 19th century, but gradually ceded control of the region in subsequent decades. Violent opposition to governmental manipulation and corruption spread to all classes by 1978 and resulted in a short-lived civil war that brought the Marxist Sandinista guerrillas to power in 1979.

British influence and control over what would become Nigeria and Africa's most populous country grew through the 19th century. A series of constitutions after World War II granted Nigeria greater autonomy. After independence in 1960, politics were marked by coups and mostly military rule, until the death of a military head of state in 1998 allowed for a political transition. In 1999, a new constitution was adopted and a peaceful transition to civilian government was completed.

General Profile encompassing all governmental entities of Islamic Republic of Pakistan.

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