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Fatuma, an agricultural laborer in Tanzania, is among the millions of women worldwide who work on land but don’t own land of their own.
12 May 2020
Africa
Sub-Saharan Africa

This blog recapitulates the interventions made by the panelists of a recently held GODAN Action webinar on “Empowering Women for Open Data Mapping in Agriculture: Implications for Land Rights and the SDGs in Africa”, Victor Sunday, Dr. Toyin Ojo, Nathalie Sidibe and Uchechi Shirley Anaduaka.  

How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 April 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzania

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

A woman speaks about land rights during a community meeting
19 December 2019
Authors: 
Namati
Africa
Kenya

Matito Leruso was born and raised in the herding community of Lengurma in Isiolo County. Communal grazing land has been central to her community’s livelihood, wellbeing, and identity for generations, but they have never had their legal rights to govern it recognized. None of Kenya’s thousands of pastoralist communities have. This changed in 2016, with the passage of the Community Land Act. Since then, Matito has joined other residents of Lengurma in working to understand, use and shape the new law to ensure that their community land rights are respected and upheld.

5 November 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Elisa Scalise
Ethiopia
Uganda
Peru
Indonesia

Considering that land tenure security is crucial to better outcomes for women it is a surprise that there is not more evidence out there on what works to achieve it.

Why Women Farmers Deserve the Right to Identity
18 October 2019
Authors: 
Shipra Deo
Kenya
China
Myanmar
Bangladesh

On the 2019 International Day of Rural Women, Landesa’s Shipra Deo explores how land rights are an essential element for overturning misperceptions about the role of women in society and on the farm.

In a workshop with a group of agronomists who work in agriculture extension in India, I ask the participants to draw the picture of a farmer with whom they work. All but one of them draw male figures.

31 August 2019
Authors: 
Stacey Zammit
Global

Increasingly, governments and citizens in developing countries as well as development agencies are using information technology to improve governance, shape government-citizen relations, and reduce corruption. Despite this, we continue to be at the first phases of understanding how to best use these new data sources in anti-corruption work, as well as appreciating the challenges and limitations inherent in them.  

sierra leone.jpg
30 May 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Caroline Long
Sierra Leone
openfield
23 May 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Tim Davies
Global

This week an important new book on ‘The State of Open Data: Histories and Horizons’ was launched by IDRC and African Minds.

We cannot wait indefinitely – interim options for land reform
18 June 2018
Authors: 
Sobantu Mzwakali
South Africa

The failure to secure the property rights of rural communities shows a clear policy gap between citizens and rights to land as per the Constitution and the attitude and practices of the state, traditional leaders, white farmers and mining companies in relation to such rights. 

Blogs

Events

Discussions

Organizations

A Articulação dos Povos Indígenas do Brasil – APIB é uma instância de aglutinação e referência nacional do movimento indígena no Brasil, que nasceu com o propósito de:

– fortalecer a união dos povos indígenas, a articulação entre as diferentes regiões e organizações indígenas do país;
– unificar as lutas dos povos indígenas, a pauta de reivindicações e demandas e a política do movimento indígena;
– mobilizar os povos e organizações indígenas do país contra as ameaças e agressões aos direitos indígenas.

Community Land Scotland was established in 2010 as a response to the need for a collective voice for community landowners in Scotland. It is a company limited by guarantee with charitable status.

Our current membership includes Scottish community landowners – owning and managing approx. 500,000 acres between them – and aspiring community landowners of varying shapes and sizes throughout Scotland.

A Fundação Nacional do Índio – FUNAI é o órgão indigenista oficial do Estado brasileiro. Criada por meio da Lei nº 5.371, de 5 de dezembro de 1967, vinculada ao Ministério da Justiça, é a coordenadora e principal executora da política indigenista do Governo Federal. Sua missão institucional é proteger e promover os direitos dos povos indígenas no Brasil.

A team of bachelors students from the 2016-2019 class of the European Law School Programme working with data collected by students from the 2017-2020 class of the European Law School Programme with the aim of creating a summary of the land laws for multiple countries.

 

The team consists of: Bert Brookfield-Hird, Alexandra Aldous, Lisa Beatrice Ferrari, Doris Beganović, Magda Jacyna and Ines Garreau.

O MMTR-NE nasceu na década de 80 a partir das reflexões e do intercâmbio de trabalhadoras rurais dos estados de Pernambuco e Paraíba. Com o intuito de superar as dificuldades na relação de gênero, as feministas rurais desses dois estados realizaram um encontro que reuniu mulheres de todo o Nordeste e contribui para que, em 1986, o Movimento da Mulher Trabalhadora Rural do Nordeste fosse construído.

Resource Equity works to advance women’s rights to land and natural resources in order to promote women’s economic and social empowerment, and to reduce poverty while promoting lasting and equitable global development.

A Terra de Direitos é uma organização de Direitos Humanos que atua na defesa, na promoção e na efetivação de direitos, especialmente os econômicos, sociais, culturais e ambientais (Dhesca).

A organização surgiu em Curitiba (PR), em 2002, para atuar em situações de conflitos coletivos relacionados ao acesso à terra e aos territórios rural e urbano. Atualmente, a Terra de Direitos incide nacional e internacionalmente nas temáticas de direitos humanos e conta com escritórios em Santarém (PA), em Curitiba (PR) e em Brasília (DF).

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Some of East Africa's most traditional pastoralist and hunter-gatherer communities are currently at great risk of loosing their land and resources due to progressive land encroachment and lack of representation in modern Tanzania. 



​UCRT works to empower marginalised people in the rangelands of northern Tanzania to secure rights to their natural resources and land. 



ABOUT

The Working Group for women and land ownership (WGWLO), is a network of 41 NGOs, CBOs and individuals in Gujarat, working on the issue of agriculture land ownership from livelihood, security, rights and empowerment angle for women. These are CBOs and NGOs spread in more than 15 districts of Gujarat, working at the rural grass roots level since 2003.

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