Logo
Acronym: 
UCRT
Civil Society Organization
Focal point: 
Mr. Makko J. Sinandei P.O.Box 15111 Arusha

Location

Olasiti
Olasiti-Arusha
Arusha
Tanzania
TZ

Some of East Africa's most traditional pastoralist and hunter-gatherer communities are currently at great risk of loosing their land and resources due to progressive land encroachment and lack of representation in modern Tanzania. 



​UCRT works to empower marginalised people in the rangelands of northern Tanzania to secure rights to their natural resources and land. 



UCRT helps these communities by representing their land rights, advocating on their behalf to local and national government, and  securing legal ownership of their traditional lands.



We also help empower these communities to independently and effectively manage their land and resources, and to improve education, women's protection and advocacy, as well as their leadership and representation among the wider Tanzanian community.

Ujamaa Community Resource Team Resources

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18
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Reports & Research
March 2017
Tanzania

In this communiqué, the undersigned Non-State Actors (civil society,pastoralist, research, private, farmers’ unions and other stakeholders) champion a call to action and outline recommendations on livestock policy advocacy strategies that take into consideration the unique conditions and opportunities of the livestock sector development in Tanzania.

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Reports & Research
December 2016
Tanzania

This is a stakeholder submission prepared by a coalition of 24 pastoralists and huntergatherers’ Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), forums, networks and groups. The stakeholders submission is a compilation of primary and secondary sources of information, evidence and facts collected through consultative meetings and interviews with civil society organizations, public officials and community members, experts on pastoralism as well as members of the academia.

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Reports & Research
January 2016
Tanzania

The report explores the evictions of pastoralists and other conflicts over pastoralists’ land in Tanzania, with focus on the past decade. 

Although most of these evictions and land based conflicts have been documented, the associated human and legal rights violations have increasingly lead to concern amongst civil society. A study was therefore commissioned to collate the available information as well as to visit affected pastoralist communities to assess the current situation faced by pastoralists in the country. 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2015
Tanzania

Pastoralist and hunter-gatherer communities in Tanzania are gaining rights to own and control their land as the foundation for generating new income through REDD+ 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2015
Tanzania

Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) have the potential to benefit both people and wildlife in Tanzania. But are Tanzanian communities earning enough from WMAs to want to protect the wildlife that live on their land? This policy brief addresses this question by examining two WMAs in the Tarangire ecosystem and looking at their performance and revenue streams. This reveals that while communities are earning some income, the WMAs do not yet have enough funds to cover management and wildlife protection costs.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2015
Tanzania

While the guarantees provided in the Katiba mark an extraordinary achievement for women’s land rights, many more steps are needed to reach gender-equitable land ownership in Tanzania. Mama Ardhi members therefore continue to advocate for additional changes in policy and practice that will bring about real transformation for women, their children and society as a whole. 

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2014
Tanzania

Communal lands are central to the livelihoods of many Tanzanians, particularly to pastoralists and hunter-gatherer groups. But a number of factors can undermine the security of these lands remaining ‘communal,’ in turn threatening the livelihoods of many people and cultures. This brief sets out a new mechanism for strengthening community land rights by securing local tenure through acquiring a Certificate of Customary Right of Occupancy (CCRO).

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2013
Tanzania

In northern Tanzania, new grassroots groups called Women’s Rights and Leadership Forums (WRLFs) are mobilizing women and men in pastoralist communities to promote and defend local land rights. This briefing highlights some of the WRLFs’ achievements and strategies; asks how these forums, which appear to be a part of an emerging grassroots social movement for land rights, can be further supported; and explores whether such forums could be replicated elsewhere in the region

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