Rangelands, Drylands & Pastoralism related Blog post | Land Portal
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11 September 2020
Authors: 
Michael Brown
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Global

The global conservation community now faces the added challenge of Covid-19 on top of a longstanding set of complex conservation, sustainability, and development challenges. In the wake of this pandemic, return to business as usual is not a viable option. The existing systems and structures upon which conservation is based must evolve. Climate change, biodiversity conservation, and poverty elimination efforts have been further complicated by Covid-19, with the brunt of the pandemic borne most acutely by the poorest and most vulnerable.

1 September 2020
Authors: 
Ms. B. Munkhtuvshin
Mongolia

In central Mongolia, the summer is warm and soft rain falls on the steppes. For herders like Baasandorj, it is a busy time of year, filled with combing sheep’s wool, milking cows and making dairy products for the winter. 

4 August 2020
Authors: 
Catherine-Lune Grayson
Western Africa
Mali
Iraq
Global

From Mali to Iraq, people in conflict zones are proving especially vulnerable to climate extremes

An estimated 100,000 people died and livestock were decimated when a long drought hit West Africa in the 1970s.

Isa, a 61-year-old community leader from northern Mali, recalled: “At that time, we only had to search for food. We could move freely with our animals. Now, we can’t even search for food. We are forced to stay in place or move to cities because of the insecurity.”

Young champions – hope for Mongolia’s herding traditions
27 July 2020
Authors: 
Ms. Suvd Boldbaatar
Mongolia

“It's hard to find the right life partner in my soum (district). Most of the girls went to school, then to university in the city. Not many of them are good at herding.” 

Like most young women who grew up in the city, I usually think of herders as quiet men with closed faces that are wrinkled and burnt by the sun. Khuukhenduu Naranbold is quite the opposite. He is smooth-skinned with an open face and a big smile. Even though he is only 23 years old, he is self-confident and keen to talk.  

Khuukhenduu’s comments about marriage and herding were recorded in 2016 at the beginning of a five-year action research project on women’s land tenure security, called WOLTS. The project has focused on pastoralist communities affected by mining, and has involved repeated visits and evidence gathering in several communities in Mongolia and Tanzania. I have been a part of the WOLTS team since June 2016.

Khuukhenduu comes from Dalanjargalan in the Gobi Desert – an area of Mongolia where the traditional herding lifestyle is under threat, not only from mining but also because many young herder men are struggling to marry. This is because boys, especially in herding families, are expected to look after the family’s animals, while girls are more likely to finish school and go to university. Once the girls leave to study in the city, few want to return to the harsh herding lifestyle.

Although it is difficult to find a partner, Khuukhenduu is not unhappy. He is a keen horseman and very proud of his riding skills. He is a member of the Mongolian Federation of Horse Racing and Trainers, and he loves racing. Unlike most other herders, who have adopted Chinese motorcycles and modern clothes, he still herds his animals on horseback and often wears a beautiful red deel (traditional costume). 

However the nomadic herding life is difficult, and, although he lives in his own ger (traditional felted tent), Khuukhenduu stays close to his parents so that taking care of animals can be shared. At the same time, he uses social media to keep in touch with his school friends – and with girls.

This contrast between tradition and modern technology illustrates the tensions and rapid changes taking place in today’s herding lifestyle. Khuukhenduu has profound knowledge of nature and how to successfully make a living from the land. He also embraces the internet, and was an eager participant in our WOLTS training programme this year on gender, land rights and the law.

In his small community in Dalanjargalan, Khuukhenduu is already well known. Although he does not have high academic qualifications, he is a skilled manager who knows how to maintain pastureland and raise quality livestock. He is also a confident speaker and a natural leader, so it is not surprising that older participants in the WOLTS programme selected him to become a community champion on gender and land. In some ways in his everyday life he is just like a CEO – taking responsibility, always having to think about the future and plan for both the good times and the bad, while constantly carrying out a whole range of highly skilled herding activities.  

Mongolian masculinity is celebrated in July every year in the Naadam festival of the three ‘manly sports’ of horse riding, wrestling and archery. Khuukhenduu is a participant and fierce competitor in Naadam games – especially horse racing. But his skills, grounded in the country’s herding traditions, will be lost unless the country and the government support nomadic families to thrive. 

I often worry that our country does not put sufficient value on the traditional knowledge and skills of herding people. If the herders go, Mongolia will lose centuries of experience in sustainable land and animal management. If Khuukhenduu struggles to marry and raise a family, what hope is there for other young herders? 

The herding life is not for everyone, but I know that city life also has its problems. I also realise that knowledge often comes from life’s experiences, not only from books and university. As Mongolia looks for ways to develop new industries we need to remember our proud nomadic heritage and make sure we protect herders’ land rights, not only to support tourism but – most importantly – as the foundation for so many Mongolian families’ lives. As trained and respected community champions, thoughtful young leaders like Khuukhenduu are the very people who offer us hope for the future.

 

 

jordan_landscape
17 April 2020
Authors: 
Joren Verbist
Jordan

Joren Verbist is a third-year undergraduate student undertaking a major in International land- and water management at the University of Wageningen (WUR).  He is also currently carrying out an internship at the International Centre of Agriculture Research Dryland Areas (ICARDA), in Amman, Jordan.  The below blog details some of his experiences, as well as preliminary information on his research. 

Maasai herder on the flooded Mundarara road, northern Tanzania
30 January 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
Africa
Tanzania
Asia
Mongolia
Global

I write this blog as our project team embarks on a fifth year of work on women’s land tenure security (WOLTS) with pastoral communities in mining-affected areas of Mongolia and Tanzania. Just before Christmas 2019, we were in Mundarara village in northern Tanzania. Exceptionally heavy rains made getting around much more challenging than usual. Locals travelling on foot had to make wide detours to avoid getting bogged down in waterlogged grazing land, and it took everyone much longer to get to the village primary school for our long-planned training day. 

Rangelands
7 January 2020
Authors: 
Fiona Flintan
Global

The Rangelands Initiative of the International Land Coalition (ILC) is drawing attention to rangelands and drylands at the highest levels, in order to find solutions to the challenges faced by local populations that live and work there, and to encourage appropriate investment including in securing land rights and good governance, building resilience to drought and other shocks or stresses, and increasing rangeland productivity.

27 June 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Juliet Tsuma
Africa

On 27-30 May 2019 around 200 actors engaged in talks to initiate and reinforce guidelines and actions on sustainable soil management and land governance at the World Agroforestry headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya.

“Soil is a universal element for survival,” says Alice Kaudia, Founder and Executive Director, Eco-Entrepreneurs. Kaudia alongside Alexander Mueller, Managing Director, Think Tank for Sustainability (TMG) moderated plenary sessions during the 2019 Global Soil Week. 

30 April 2019
Authors: 
Ms. B. Munkhtuvshin
Mongolia

One snowy winter’s day I went to a small winter camp of just two households 140 km from the nearest soum (district) centre. A dog stopped me getting out of the car for some time but eventually a man came to hold it back, explaining that the man from the neighbouring household was away on Otor migration in the mountains with his cattle. The two men were brothers, and the one left behind, Batbold, was taking care of their smaller livestock. It was very cold in his ger and I had the impression that he had not made a fire all day.

23 April 2019
Authors: 
Narangerel Yansanjav
Mongolia

“I am one of the woman-headed households in this soum. I have been a herder for many years. For me life is still good, because I have a grown-up son who can help me. He became a herder when he was just 8 years old.”

“A woman has long hair but a short brain”
9 July 2018
Authors: 
Lkhamdulam Natsagdorj
Mongolia

Reflections on an old Mongolian saying

 

At a recent gender training session in Mongolia, a middle-aged man used the old Mongolian saying that “a woman has long hair and a short brain” when we asked participants to name some of the main characteristics of women and men. I was glad that he was corrected by a much older man, who pointed out that the saying relates to traditional gender roles that are already very different from what they were just a few years ago.

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Bulgarian Journal of Agricultural Science

From the beginning of 1995 the Agricultural Academy in Bulgaria is publishing Bulgarian Journal of Agricultural Science (BJAS)® - the first agricultural scientific journal in Bulgaria for fundamental and applied researches, published entirely in English language, and one of the few such journals in Central Europe.

Conservation Letters (Conservation Letters)

Conservation Letters : A Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology

CBU

Motto

The motto of the Copperbelt University is "Knowledge and Service" . Enshrined in the motto are the following strands:

MOTTO

The Dedan Kimathi University of Technology motto is: “Better Life through Technology”.

 

VISION STATEMENT

To be a Premier Technological University Excelling in Quality Education, Research, and Technology Transfer for National Development.

 

MISSION STATEMENT

The Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review (EASSRR) is a bi-annual journal published by the Organization for Social Science Research in Eastern Africa (OSSREA). Since the publication of its maiden issue in January 1985, the EASSRR has been serving as a regional forum for reflective thinking and critical discourse on the economic, political, and social aspects as well as development issues of the countries and sub-regions within the Eastern and Southern African Region

FoLT logo

Friends of Lake Turkana (FoLT) is a grassroots organization, that works with and on behalf of the communities within the greater Turkana basin to demand their collective social, economic, environmental, cultural and territorial rights. Recognizing the anti-patriarchal struggle is a vision expressed in all areas of our work. Our mission is to; demand environmental and climate justice; secure land and territorial rights; advocate for meaningful participation of citizens in budget making processes, resource governance; and provide for women-led community advocacy

 

The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) was established in 1977. It is one of 15 such centers supported by the CGIAR. ICARDA’s founding mandate to promote agricultural development in the dry areas of developing countries remains highly relevant today. 

IJSSS

International Journal of Social Science Studies journal encourages and publishes research and studies in the field of Anthropology, Archaeology, Area Studies, Communication Studies, Criminology & Criminal Justice, Cultural and Ethnic Studies, Economics, Education, Geography, History, Law, Linguistics, Management, Philosophy,Political Science, Psychology, Sociology.

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

The International Land Coalition (ILC) is a coalition of civil society and intergovernmental organizations promoting secure and equitable access to and control over land for poor women and men thro

MISSION: To contribute to improved livelihoods through offering a bridge between communities, stakeholders and policy makers in the promotion of equitable access and sustainable management of land and natural resources.

VISION: To become a centre of excellence in promoting the application of appropriate land policies, laws and management practices by empowering society through innovative and knowledge based advocacy and capacity building in Kenya and the region.

LDGI values of Integrity, Trust and Professionalism influence the way we work every day and everywhere.

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The Lawyers' Environmental Action Team (LEAT) was established to ensure Tanzania's environment and natural resources are sustainably managed.

Their mission is to enhance the capacity and participation of the people in sub-Saharan Africa to sustainably manage their natural resources and environment through legal, policy and other strategic interventions.

LEAT’s major activities are conducting legal and social-policy research, advocacy work, public interest litigation and giving legal advice.

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