Acronym: 
CPR
Non-profit organization
University or Research Institution
Focal point: 
Namita Wahi
Phone number: 
+91 11 2611 5273/76

Location

Dharam Marg, Chanakyapuri 110021 New Delhi
India
IN
Postal address: 
Centre for Policy Research Dharam Marg, Chanakyapuri New Delhi 110021
Working languages: 
English

The Centre for Policy Research (CPR) has been one of India’s leading public policy think tanks since 1973. The Centre is a non-profit, non-partisan independent institution dedicated to conducting research that contributes to the production of high quality scholarship, better policies, and a more robust public discourse about the structures and processes that shape life in India.

CPR’s community of distinguished academics and practitioners drawn from different disciplines and professional backgrounds. The institution nurtures and supports scholarly excellence. However,the institution as such does not take a collective position on issues. CPR's scholars have complete autonomy to express their individual views. Senior faculty collaborate with more than 50 young professionals and academics at CPR and with partners around the globe to investigate topics critical to India’s future.

Centre for Policy Research Resources

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Paralegals for Environmental Justice cover image
Training Resources & Tools
December 2017
Global

A community paralegal, also known as a grassroots legal advocate or a barefoot lawyer, is a community resource person and mobiliser, trained in basic law and legal procedures and in skills like mediation, negotiation, education, and advocacy.

Reports & Research
September 2017
India

This is a working paper by Kanchi Kohli and Debayan Gupta, Centre for Policy Research,Namati Environmental Justice Program, which throws light on Right  to  Fair  Compensation  and  Transparency  in  Land  Acquisition,  Rehabilitation  and Resettlement (RFCTLARR) Act, 2013. It is indiacted that there has been at the centre of intense debate.

Reports & Research
February 2017
India

This report produced by Centre for Policy Research (CPR) a comprehensive and systematic study of Supreme Court cases on land acquisition from 1950- 2016 and examined particular conflicts involving major dams, special economic zones, housing complexes and industrial projects. It highlight  the legal trajectory of land acquisition in India and attempt to provide deep understanding on how disputes over land are actually adjudicated in the Supreme Court and nature and pattern of litigation.

Institutional & promotional materials
September 2016
India

The handbook does not specifically list judicial and court related remedies to any of these problems. In case the problem does not get resolved through the administrative route, clients and community practitioners have the option of accessing avenues such as the National Green Tribunal (NGT) and Courts which are accessed through lawyers. In such instances, the evidence collected, complaints filed and other documentation could form an important basis and support for any legal intervention.

Policy Papers & Briefs
July 2016
India

This document, titled Closing the Enforcement Gap: Groundtruthing of Environmental Violations in Sarguja, Chhattisgarh,is the second in the series of community led groundtruthing exercises carried out by the Centre for Policy Research (CPR)-Namati Environmental Justice Program in partnership with Janabhivyakti and Hasdeo Arand Bachao Sangharsh Samiti (HABSS).

Policy Papers & Briefs
May 2015
India

Policy and planning documents define eight types of settlement in Delhi, only one of which is termed “planned”. The other seven types of settlement become, by opposition, ‘unplanned’. This ‘unplanned’ city houses the vast majority of Delhi’s residents across the economic spectrum: these settlements include the affluent farmhouses of South Delhi, well-built colonies populated by successful businesspeople, and dense slum-like areas.

Policy Papers & Briefs
November 2014
Global

The Pacific Islands, a group of fourteen island nations in the South Pacific Ocean had been a source of low interest for the global powers, however, this seems to have changed as Asia draws increasing attention from the world economies in the 21st century. Despite geographical distance and unenthusiastic historical interaction, initiation of India’s development engagement with these island nations date back to as early as the year 1973.

Policy Papers & Briefs
April 2014
India

The unauthorised colony (UAC) is one of the seven types of ‘unplanned’ settlement designated by the Government of National Capital Territory of Delhi (GNCTD). UACs are residential settlements built in contravention of zoning regulations, developed either in violation of Delhi’s master plans or on ‘illegally’ subdivided agricultural land.

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