Namibia University of Science and Technology | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
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Acronym: 
NUST

Location

Windhoek
Namibia
NA
Working languages: 
English

Known for being a trendsetter in higher education and applied research internationally, the Namibian University of Science and Technology (NUST) aims to become the leading university in Africa. The Department of Land and Property Sciences (DLPS) offers relevant degrees at undergraduate and post-graduate level including master and doctorate degrees. The Department of Land and Property Sciences (DLPS) at NUST together with the Integrated Land Management Institute (ILMI) are playing a leading role in research and outreach in the field of land governance and administration.

The purpose of NELGA (Network of Excellence for Land Governance in Africa) is to enhance the role of selected African Universities and academic institutions in support of land policy development, implementation and monitoring. NUST was selected as a NELGA node for Southern Africa, because of its proven leadership and track record in academic education, training and research on land governance. To date NUST as a regional NELGA node has granted 6 scholarships (4 masters and 2 PhD’s) on land governance via the DAAD scholarship. The node is in the processes of identifying partner institutions for full implementation of the NELGA activities. One of the key work packages is to establish a regional node for NELGA Southern Africa.

Namibia University of Science and Technology Resources

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December 2018

Namibia is moving towards an urbanised country. This is illustrated by the fact that at independence Namibia was only 28% urbanized by 2011 urbanization has already grown to 42% and current projections are that by 2020 urbanization would by 66% and more than 70% by 2030. As the urban population is growing the need for serviced land and housing is also growing.

December 2018

Ancestral land refers to ‘land of ancestors’. That is the land occupied by ones’ forebearers for generations and left something behind of value for current and future generations. There are usually contestations as to which ancestors the land

belongs because of the history of internal migration and of displacements by stronger nations (tribes).

December 2018

There has been rapid growth in urban populations in Namibia (Pendleton et al, 2014). This growth is amongst predominantly amongst less educated, poorer migrants from rural areas in search of opportunities in urban areas. From the data available the estimated shortfall of either titled land or houses appears to be above 150 000 and increasing at about 11 000 per year (Weber, 2017).

December 2018

Communal land is one of the land tenure systems in Namibia, the other being freehold land tenure system.

December 2018

Namibia is compelled to observe and to undertake efforts to realise the right to adequate housing, since it has ratified the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in 1994.

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