Acronym: 
TNRF
Civil Society Organization

The Tanzania Natural Resource Forum seeks to improve governance and accountability in Tanzania’s natural resource sector to achieve more sustainable rural livelihoods and better conservation outcomes.  As a member-driven NGO, TNRF works to improve policy and practice for the better, by helping to bridge the gap between:

  • People’s local natural resource management needs and practices; and 
  • National natural resource management priorities, policies, laws and programs

TNRF supports its members by improving communication, sharing information, promoting collaboration and strengthening collective action. TNRF has a growing membership of more than 3,800 people and organizations, supporting professional staff, and a steering committee drawn from the membership.

Vision

To see policy and practice in the natural resource sector changed for the better– through improved governance and accountability.

Mission

To bring about improved natural resource governance in Tanzania by being a demand-driven network of members and partners that helps people to bridge the gap between people’s local natural resource management needs and practices, and national natural resource management priorities, policies, laws and programs.

Tanzania Natural Resource Forum Resources

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24
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Journal Articles & Books
May 2017
Tanzania

Land-use conflict is not a new phenomenon for pastoralists  and farmers in Tanzania with murders, the killing of livestock and the loss of property as  a  consequence of  this  conflict  featuring   in  the  news  for  many years  now.  Various actors,  including civil society organisations, have tried  to  address  farmer–pastoralist conflict through  mass  education programmes, land-use planning, policy reforms and  the development of community institutions. However, these efforts have not succeeded in the conflict.

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Conference Papers & Reports
March 2017
Tanzania

Administration of land in Tanzania is more decentralized from the president to the village level. The law gives power to village councils and village assemblies to administer village land. The District authorities are given advisory and supervisory mandates over villages and represent the commissioner who takes overall administrative powers.  Despite decentralization, institutions responsible for land administration, land have continued to be cause of many conflicts for years.  Conflicts have been escalating and lead loss of lives and property.

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Conference Papers & Reports
March 2017
Tanzania

This preliminary study involved consultation of responsible district government officials and relevant Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) on various issues related to land and investments. Among other areas, the Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor of Tanzania (SAGCOT) was selected as a study site and study used the Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) to obtain information. Questionnaire designed reflected land investment  governance  process  thematic  areas.

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Conference Papers & Reports
March 2017
Tanzania

Land is one of the terrains of struggle for most rural women in Africa because of its importance in sustaining rural livelihoods, and social-cultural and geopolitical factors that hinder women from enjoying land rights. Even when there are progressive land laws, as it is for Tanzania, women have not really enjoyed their rights. However, this has not stopped women to keep fighting for their land rights.  They have sought their own approaches by leveraging opportunities within traditional, religious, and formal systems standing for their rights. 

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Reports & Research
December 2016
Tanzania

This is a stakeholder submission prepared by a coalition of 24 pastoralists and huntergatherers’ Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), forums, networks and groups. The stakeholders submission is a compilation of primary and secondary sources of information, evidence and facts collected through consultative meetings and interviews with civil society organizations, public officials and community members, experts on pastoralism as well as members of the academia.

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Reports & Research
December 2016
Tanzania

Tanzania is endowed with numerous resources including livestock. It is number three country in Africa in terms of livestock population after Ethiopia and Sudan. Currently, the country (Tanzania) has more than 22 million livestock, of which at least 95% are indigenous animals kept under traditional livelihood model known as indigenous pastoralism. At least 70% of Tanzanians earn their living through agro-pastoralism whereby around 40% of them entirely practices indigenous pastoralism.

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Reports & Research
December 2016
Tanzania

Training volunteers to help their communities defend their land rights has proved an effective approach for promoting land justice in Tanzania. This report documents how Hakiardhi, a Dar-es-Salaam based research institute working on land governance issues, has established and trained a 600-strong network of male and female ‘Land Rights Monitors’ (LRMs) operating in 300 villages on various aspects of the land law, so they can help people and local governments to exercise and ensure respect for their legal rights in land disputes.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
October 2015
Tanzania

Between 2005 and 2009 the emergence of large-scale acquisitions of land or ‘land grabbing’ for production of food and energy feedstocks, and private forest plantations in developing countries, triggered various responses from global actors.

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Policy Papers & Briefs
December 2014
Tanzania

In the year 2014, the PP has recorded great achievements in terms of revised outcomes. Some unique and strategic approaches employed by the PP are partly the reason for the achievements. This brief is a summary of the key achievements made and the strategies or approaches used in 2014. 

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Reports & Research
October 2014
Tanzania

This scoping study was commissioned to identify issues on land/forest related investment in Tanzania as part of a strategic engagement between Tanzania Natural Resource Forum (TNRF), HAKIARDHI/ LARRRI and the World Wide Fund for Nature – Coastal East Africa Initiative (WWF-CEAI).

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