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LAND TENURE IN MEKONG FOREST LANDSCAPES
Reports & Research
Conference Papers & Reports
September 2021
Southern Asia

The Summary Report of the 3rd Mekong Regional Land Forum provides a comprehensive review of the key messages from the event including a synthesis of keynote speeches, key take-aways, the links to all presentations and additional documentation.

 

The social costs of tenure risk
Reports & Research
September 2021
Sub-Saharan Africa

This report assesses the costs and effectiveness of responsible investment practices in emerging market contexts. Its results make the business case for investments in social risk mitigation and avoidance practices. Such practices include community engagement efforts, impact assessments and the establishment of grievance resolution mechanisms.

LAND-at-scale Uganda cover image
Policy Papers & Briefs
October 2021
Uganda

This one-pager provides details on the LAND-at-scale project in Uganda. This project is implemented by the Global Land Tool Network, faciliated by UN-Habitat, and financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs via the Netherlands Enterprise & Development Agency. 

landatscalerwanda-cover image.PNG
Policy Papers & Briefs
August 2021
Rwanda

This one-pager provides details on the LAND-at-scale project in Rwanda. This project is implemented by Kadaster International and IDLO, and financed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs via the Netherlands Enterprise & Development Agency. 

Bhutan Forest Note
Reports & Research
July 2019
Bhutan

The Bhutan Forest Note articulates opportunities for supporting Bhutan's sustainable development aspirations, including its constitutional commitment to maintain at least 60 percent of the country's land area under forest cover and to better respond or prepare for vulnerabilities such as climate change and natural disasters.

Bhutan Systematic Country Diagnostic
Reports & Research
January 2020
Bhutan

Bhutan is a small, landlocked country deep in the eastern Himalayas between India and China. Over a horizontal distance of just 100-150 km, the elevation rises from about 150 meters above sea level in the south to over 7,000 meters in the north. The population of about 735,0001 is scattered across steep mountain slopes and valleys, many in remote and far-flung hamlets.

Changes in Property Rights and Management of High-Elevation Rangelands in Bhutan: Implications for S
Peer-reviewed publication
August 2017
Bhutan

Property rights and management regimes for high-elevation rangelands in Bhutan have evolved over centuries in response to environmental, cultural, and political imperatives. The 2007 Land Act of Bhutan aims to redress historical inequities in property rights by redistributing grazing leases to local livestock owners in a process known as rangeland nationalization.

Climate change and potential impacts on agriculture in Bhutan: a discussion of pertinent issues
Peer-reviewed publication
November 2018
Bhutan

Background: The Himalayan country of Bhutan is typically an agrarian country with about 57% of the people depending on agriculture. However, farming has been constrained by the mountainous topography and rapid changes in environmental variabilities. With climate change, agricultural production and food security is likely to face one of the biggest challenges of the twenty-first century.

BTI 2020 Country Report: Bhutan
Reports & Research
May 2020
Bhutan

Bhutan’s democracy consolidated further following the third elections to National Council and National Assembly in 2018. In the primary round of National Assembly elections, voters favored a newly established third party, Druk Nyamrup Tshogpa (DNT), followed by the opposition in the last parliament, Druk Phuensum Tshogpa (DPT).

Tanzania-Land-Reform
Policy Papers & Briefs
January 2020
Tanzania

Secure land and property rights are essential for improving the livelihoods of the poor and ending poverty. Effective and equitable land governance can also contribute to economic development, domestic resource mobilisation and climate change resilience. Promoting fair and transparent land tenure systems should therefore be a priority for national governments.

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